Finally Watching [Nostalgia Movies]

The primary forum for general discussion of Hipinion.com

Postby number none » Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:57 am

the Lion King is supposed to be inspired by Hamlet, although the similarities are fairly superficial

and Tezuka was supposedly heavily influenced by Bambi when he created Kimba so i guess it's the circle of life or something
User avatar
number none
 
Posts: 25903
Joined: Wed May 26, 2010 9:00 am

Postby aububs » Mon Sep 18, 2017 9:09 am

chairkicker wrote:dead in their effect via pop culture saturation the same way so much of the holy grail is dead now


oh ok
no buddy not really
User avatar
aububs
 
Posts: 2976
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:18 pm

Postby DestructoBot » Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:06 am

Merciel wrote:The Princess Bride (1987)The movie doesn't really get into that, at least not overtly. But it also doesn't give Buttercup anything else to do. So she ends up being kind of an extra-passive early-model Disney princess, which is pretty lame but not really the movie's fault. It can only do so much to minimize what's in the source material, particularly given that Goldman wrote the screen adaptation himself.


i feel like robin wright added a sort of annoyed boredom to a lot of her post-wesley scenes
User avatar
DestructoBot
 
Posts: 4997
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:09 pm

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:19 am

Catching up, the main thing I got out of Little Shop of Horrors is that Ashman probably had better things to do than write for Disney. Dentists and tract homes are pretty easy targets but he did a really good job with them. And other than "Gaston" I can't think of any Disney songs that particularly benefit from his lyrics.

I assume the shorter ending doesn't have the "Somewhere That's Green" joke so it must be worse.

The Wikipedia page for The Lion King would have me believe that Disney expected Pocahontas to be the bigger movie and distributed its resources accordingly. I have a hard time squaring that with the cast of The Lion King, which by my count includes eight actual celebrities. On the other hand, Pocahontas got Menken. But Elton John was probably more expensive.

I would rate the songs as above Aladdin's but below the other two's. "I Just Can't Wait to Be King" is really irritating but I think with different lyrics and a different singer it would probably be fine. I once made a post about how when I was 9 I fell asleep to The Lion King soundtrack on a long train ride and dreamt in a really fulfilling and memorable way about having a girlfriend. I spent a while just now trying to find it but I couldn't, but I did find this so I feel okay:

Spoilt Victorian Child wrote:I used to have a ball that looked like Rigel. Sort of like this:

Image

It made me feel just amazing.

Anyway I forget the rest of this post.
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:23 am

5:30 huh, that's really great.
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby Merciel » Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:29 am

Dirty Dancing (1987)

This is one of the most half-assed "period" movies ever put together. It is positively delightful how much they're not even really trying to channel 1963. The token black couple is totally integrated, nobody blinks an eye. There isn't a single female character under the age of 40 in this movie who doesn't have hair straight out of 1987, and with each subsequent scene their costumes get less and less interested in even pretending to be '60s stuff, until by the climactic dance scene Penny's just rocking a straight-up off-the-shoulder red and black belted number that could have come straight out of a Bon Jovi video.

Even the music is half-assed. SVC pointed out that they didn't really need a period music consultant for this film (although they claim to have had one); you really could just listen to any oldies station for an hour and pull out the same choices.

I love it. I love everything about this movie. I love Swayze's hilariously overdone greaser accent and I love the '80s-ness of his motorcycle jacket and I love the way Jennifer Grey cracks up at him during their mambo recitals and again during the final dance number. I love that the villain has a worn-out copy of the fucking Fountainhead in his pocket and he wants it back because it's got notes in the margins.

loololololololooooolll best dumbshit villain intro ever

The class consciousness and politics in Dirty Dancing are really pretty great. We've got people acting on prejudices constantly, the poor characters scrabbling to get by and being bitter about the rich kids' obliviousness, the rich kids thinking they did everything on merit. Poor girls get used and discarded, rich ones get played for fools, neither of them is immune to rampant sexism (incl. by all the guys trying to help them) and exploitation. I don't think I've seen another major picture recently that hit so much stuff so adeptly within the confines of being a semi-lightweight rom-com that people mostly went to see because Patrick Swayze looks good sweaty.

Which he does. Male dance leads evolved considerably from Astaire to Swayze, but there's still an amazing magnetism across the decades. It's channeled into a completely different form, but it's just as much fun to watch.

I wish we still had dance pictures. I guess I could see Magic Mike (which I haven't) but I suspect it's not going to scratch quite the same itch.

10/10
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby Merciel » Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:36 am

I also love all the little touches like Baby keeping her extremely plain and basic white bra on under the mambo dress because she's uncomfortable wearing that dress directly until the absolute last second, and how stiff she is during that whole performance, and how their big climactic number is basically the same dance with a couple of extra frills, because of course Baby isn't going to have time to learn a whole new routine in a couple of weeks mostly spent banging Patrick Swayze.

I realize that was mostly a limitation for the actors on a brutal shooting schedule, but it worked out serendipitously to be exactly right for their characters, just like the arm tickle.
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Wed Sep 20, 2017 4:32 am

It is really great watching Patrick Swayze dance. Apparently his mom was a choreographer and dance instructor and that makes a lot of sense. As long as Patrick Swayze is dancing this movie is amazing.

Outside of that I think it does a lot of things well, and for the first half-hour or so I thought it was pretty deftly written. By the end though it is kind of a mess, it keeps piling on new elements and killing its momentum. I am really straining to avoid anything that could be construed as a dance metaphor. But take for example the "Nobody puts Baby in the corner" bit. Ideally we would get this somewhere near the low point in Baby's arc and everyone would be crying. But as written it's just the last of her many victories -- she's just reconciled with her sister, cracked the pickpocketing case, and reconciled with her father, and for that matter she's already had a pretty nice resolution with Swayze, and as an added bonus Robbie accidentally reveals himself as the one who got Penny pregnant. We want to see her dance again because that's just where this story is going, but it should feel like an injustice that she's not onstage, and it does not. And the reason it doesn't is that we've just watched her eat four big cupcakes. Simplify, man.

Jennifer Grey's performance is fantastic though, I didn't know she could do that. It is too bad they couldn't find a reason for Jerry Orbach to dance.

Robbie, God, what a mess. First of all just axe this character entirely, he's almost completely redundant with Kellerman, but if you're going to keep him you have to cast him better than that. And I know he's a med student because Orbach's a doctor and all but please just think for a second and make him pre-med, you can still do the thing with the letter of recommendation but now it actually makes sense that he's waiting tables over the summer and hooking up with 16-year-olds, plus you've made him a guy who tells everyone what his major is.
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby aububs » Wed Sep 20, 2017 5:14 am

Merciel wrote:I guess I could see Magic Mike (which I haven't) but I suspect it's not going to scratch quite the same itch.


it won't scratch the same itch but it's great, you should watch it
no buddy not really
User avatar
aububs
 
Posts: 2976
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:18 pm

Postby deadwolfbones » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:00 am

Magic Mike 2 might be even better. The intro dance scene is endless lols.
dead was real dumb
User avatar
deadwolfbones
 
Posts: 15856
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:19 pm
Location: indiecision

Postby aububs » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:04 am

agreed.

MM2 is just great times from beginning to end
no buddy not really
User avatar
aububs
 
Posts: 2976
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2016 3:18 pm

Postby Bartatua » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:14 am

Land before time was about my favorite movie as a child because i was really into dinosaurs and pain
i broke somebody's ribs
User avatar
Bartatua
 
Posts: 19226
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:35 pm

Postby Viola Swamp » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:21 am

Rainbow Battle Kid wrote:
Merciel wrote:The Lion King (1994)

This is supposed to be the first big Disney animated picture based on an original story rather than an adaptation of a pre-existing work, but I don't know how true that actually is.


Image


Matthew Broderick has said that when he was hired as the voice of adult Simba in The Lion King, he presumed the project was related to Kimba the White Lion.[19][20][21][22] "I thought he meant Kimba, who was a white lion in a cartoon when I was a little kid," said Broderick. "So I kept telling everybody I was going to play Kimba. I didn't really know anything about it, but I didn't really care."[23]
User avatar
Viola Swamp
 
Posts: 8040
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:50 pm
Location: I'm the queen of ice

Postby Milk » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:42 am

i couldn't even enjoy Dirty Dancing ironically. The fact that it is completely even less than half-assed about the time period was just so maddening to me the only time i saw it maybe ten years ago, i couldn't shut up about it. It's like there is ZERO fucking reason why this should be set in that time period and by the time they danced to time of my life (which of course could have never been written in any era but the 80's) i basically lost it. If the movie was any decent at all even in the genre you could look over it, there was no redeeming quality to it for me unfortunately. It's a ball of cheese wrapped in shit.

I suppose it's pointless to have such strong feelings (hot take) about what is by everyone's admittance a really corny piece of 80's pop culture that can in fact only be enjoyed with a healthy amount of irony but there is no doubt we would not remember it if it wasn't for a generation of little girls that grew up on it (i think all gfs i ever had except current one, who was either too old or too punk already when it came out, had a real fondness for it) Of course the same could be said of so many 80's action movies that have been undeservedly canonized by men my age (Predator is not a good movie as much as i would like to pretend it is).
"I'm a quivering collection of the worst and least helpful emotions: fear, anxiety, terror, paranoia, indigestion, dishpan hands.."
User avatar
Milk
 
Posts: 6145
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:56 am
Location: Shut the fuck up Milk

Postby Merciel » Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:46 pm

There's actually one very good reason to set it in 1963 rather than 1987, which is that Penny can't have easy access to condoms or the pill, and her abortion has to be super shady and illegal. That's what drives the whole movie, and none of that stuff works in 1987.

Plus I guess the writer was pulling from her own childhood and that was the appropriate time period for her, but I think the bigger thing is that the main plot drivers don't work in the '80s.
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby pana » Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:29 pm

are you going to watch:

- Risky Business
- License to Drive
- No Retreat, No Surrender
- BMX Bandits
?
User avatar
pana
 
Posts: 59944
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:32 pm

Postby Merciel » Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:58 pm

We could do Risky Business but none of the others qualify for the parameters of this project unless SVC has seen them.
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby BlackSugar » Wed Sep 20, 2017 2:02 pm

aside from being a great dancer, patrick swayze was also an UNBELIEVABLE rollerskater. his first movie role was in 'skatetown usa' and he plays ace johnson, and let me tell you something, you don't get to play the role of "ace johnson" in a movie called "skatetown usa" if you are not a superlative skater. and he really is! he had speed, could do tricks, was fearless, and had panache. that guy could do everything, except live to an old age :-(
I come like a thousand doves
User avatar
BlackSugar
COMING SOON
 
Posts: 24498
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 4:12 pm
Location: addicted to what the dick did

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:14 pm

Merciel wrote:There's actually one very good reason to set it in 1963 rather than 1987, which is that Penny can't have easy access to condoms or the pill, and her abortion has to be super shady and illegal. That's what drives the whole movie, and none of that stuff works in 1987.

Plus I guess the writer was pulling from her own childhood and that was the appropriate time period for her, but I think the bigger thing is that the main plot drivers don't work in the '80s.

Also places like Kellerman's had long since ceased to be like Kellerman's by the '80s, as alluded to in the movie and covered in this recent thread: http://forums.hipinion.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=111513
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:19 pm

And yeah this is pretty sick:



When I google "Skatetown USA" the first result is for a roller-skating facility "just 3 miles north of the Tri-County Mall." It's apparently talking about the one in Springdale, Ohio but I bet if you headed north from any other Tri-County Mall you would still find a roller-skating facility after about three miles.
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby Merciel » Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:01 am

I forgot to mention that Kermit was really into all the dance numbers on Dirty Dancing, and was positively hypnotized by the dirty dancing credits sequence.

I was reminded of this when we just watched that youtube and he spent the entire time gaping at blurry Patrick Swayze on roller skates.

Kermit is just starting to spin around and attempt leaping through the air, so I think his little toddler brain is completely blown by what actual dancers can do.
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby Merciel » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:33 am

Risky Business (1983)

I did not remember anything from this movie, other than Tom Cruise's dance scene, which I didn't remember from this so much as from seeing it in a million other places. Everything I thought I remembered from Risky Business is probably actually from Milk Money or some other movie about a hooker lost in suburbia.

This is a very weird movie. Wikipedia would have you believe it's a rom-com but it totally is not, except in the loosest sense of the word. There are a couple of funny bits but nowhere near enough to class it as a comedy. It's more of a moody wannabe Michael Mann piece with sex (mostly) standing in for the violence, down to stealing Tangerine Dream for the score. The train sequence especially is a straight Mann knockoff, but a lot of the nocturnal scenes aren't so much homages as "look ma, I can trace a picture on film!"

Anyway it's a tough movie to classify because there's no traditional happy ending. The villain ("Joey Pantoliano as Guido," possibly the greatest movie credit I've ever seen) wins: he gets at least one of his girls back, makes a fortune, and escapes scot-free. Tom Cruise doesn't improve as a person or learn anything except how to get laid and use exploited women in the sex trade -- women that he knows are brutally victimized by pimps BECAUSE HE HAD A WHOLE CHASE SCENE ABOUT IT -- to cajole schlubby middle-aged white dudes into bending the rules for him, so that he can go to Princeton and some more actually deserving kid can't.

And Rebecca de Mornay never graduates from "plot device" to "character" at any point in this movie, although she briefly comes close when she yells at Tom Cruise to stop belittling her and then dumps his dad's Porsche in the lake.

(Incidentally, was it even possible to fix an early '80s Porsche that got dumped in a lake? I want to say "no" but maybe cars were sufficiently different back then that you could. Today there's no way, all the electronics would get fried in an instant. Back then? I guess maybe, although probably not in a couple of days.)

(Incidentally pt. 2, young Rebecca de Mornay has a slight but extremely distracting resemblance to boarder port, especially when she lowers her eyelashes and looks down and off to the side. It is reaaallll weird to watch her unbuckle Tom Cruise's pants and have to remind yourself that no, that's not actually the person you know.)

Overall, the movie is basically fine, although it's almost exactly the opposite of Dirty Dancing in that Dirty Dancing is a movie that pretends to be brainless but actually interrogates a lot of stuff very critically under its surface goof, whereas Risky Business appears to want you to think it's at least semi-serious and semi-smart, and it interrogates absolutely nothing.

6.5/10
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby futurist » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:45 am

yet somehow it's tangerine dream's most perfect piece of music
User avatar
futurist
 
Posts: 6714
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2009 2:21 pm

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Thu Sep 21, 2017 5:09 am

Pantoliano just gets whatever's left of $8000 after the car is fixed. I'm pretty sure Joel's trip to Princeton is worth more than that, particularly since he is the sort of person who benefits most from an Ivy League education, a mediocre student who is good at making friends.

I am really charmed by how strange this movie is. It's a really bitter satire that's clever without being funny, but it's played so straight that it winds up with the tone of a John Hughes movie. (Merciel says Cruise doesn't improve as a person, and that's certainly true -- he becomes a much worse person, because it's a satire. But because it feels like a Hughes movie, you still have this expectation that he should have improved.) And then yeah you have that great Tangerine Dream score pulling it in Michael Mann's direction, although I think the result is more in Wong Kar-Wai's neighborhood. It makes sense that this is the only movie this guy directed because if he'd done more I would probably be used to this by now.

I also noticed that Rebecca de Mornay looks a lot like port, especially in this movie where she has bangs.
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby Merciel » Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:31 pm

I have a hard time finding it charming because Risky Business feels like a movie created by the villain from Dirty Dancing.

Some people matter, some people don't. And the movie just has no interest in scratching beyond the surface of any of that. We're treated to long sequences of Tom Cruise agonizing over his sexual frustration and inability to masturbate, but the hookers in this movie don't matter whatsoever beyond being masturbation aids that get Cruise and his friends over that hump (hur hur, see what I did there).

It is very weird but in and of itself that's not something I value highly.
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

Postby reversemigraine » Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:37 pm

I'm perfectly OK reading Risky Business as a Brickman's movie-length statement about what he thought of Princeton.
reversemigraine
 
Posts: 9742
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:40 pm

Postby DestructoBot » Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:45 pm

Merciel wrote:(Incidentally, was it even possible to fix an early '80s Porsche that got dumped in a lake? I want to say "no" but maybe cars were sufficiently different back then that you could. Today there's no way, all the electronics would get fried in an instant. Back then? I guess maybe, although probably not in a couple of days.)


there is far less going on electronically in a car from the early 80s. though not fun, it is much more feasible to replace any wiring on that car than it would be on any car now. aside from that its basically drying out all the carpets, and ensuring no water got into the engine, coolant, transmission, fuel lines, brake lines, etc. a lot of fluid flushing.
User avatar
DestructoBot
 
Posts: 4997
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:09 pm

Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:04 pm

Merciel wrote:I have a hard time finding it charming because Risky Business feels like a movie created by the villain from Dirty Dancing.

Some people matter, some people don't. And the movie just has no interest in scratching beyond the surface of any of that. We're treated to long sequences of Tom Cruise agonizing over his sexual frustration and inability to masturbate, but the hookers in this movie don't matter whatsoever beyond being masturbation aids that get Cruise and his friends over that hump (hur hur, see what I did there).

The movie has to establish Cruise as a relatable (or at least pitiable) character in order to show what this system does to him. But I think his problems are also part of the joke -- the movie is pretty upfront about the fact that his worst-case scenario is going to the University of Illinois and having a hard time masturbating.
User avatar
Spoilt Victorian Child
ok
 
Posts: 33222
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Postby Bartatua » Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:43 pm

tom cruise has slaves
i broke somebody's ribs
User avatar
Bartatua
 
Posts: 19226
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:35 pm

Postby Merciel » Fri Sep 22, 2017 3:58 am

Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986)

Kermit was extremely into "Beat City" and bopped around with a big dumb smile until it was over.

I don't know why Ferris Bueller is this great pop culture touchstone. I really don't. I liked the movie more this time than I did last time SVC made me watch it, but I can only be so charmed by a movie that posits ditching school as this great and glorious experience that will surely lead to awesome adventures and popularity.

You should go to school. You should learn things. European socialism in the '30s does matter for today's world. Ben Stein's shitty self-important grasp of history and economic policy is a problem in the present day. Devoting enormous amounts of energy to lying to your parents so that you can avoid grappling with this stuff is not ever going to make me think highly of you, and Ferris Bueller is no exception here.

The movie is basically fine apart from that, but it is sort of annoying how the narrative universe bends so that everybody Ferris needs to lie to for plot purposes is an overweening asshole who deserves it (restaurant host, Dean Rooney) and everybody who's a good-natured ne'er-do-well magically can do no harm (the joyriding valets, Ferris and his friends, probably Charlie Sheen). Most genre comedies do this to some extent, but it grates on me in this one because Ferris Bueller is almost a good enough movie to not need to lean on that crutch constantly, but it does it anyway, and as a result is not as good a movie as it could be.

The Very Serious Interlude immediately before the Ferrari takes an ass dive out of the garage is pretty weird. It doesn't really fit with the rest of the movie and it comes out of nowhere because we never actually see Cameron's parents be dicks to each other or to him. He does talk about it with the other characters, but we never witness this behavior firsthand and so the Ferrari's suicide leap seems way out of whack. How do we know Cameron's right in his read of the situation? What reason do we have to believe that he's going to improve his relationship with his dad now, as opposed to just driving the poor guy to jump after his car because now his only solace in a miserable life is gone?

Matthew Broderick is phenomenally charming in this though. So is Alan Ruck. Watching the two of them play off each other is the main reason this movie's fun. Sloane is a total nothing of a character, which isn't really Mia Sara's fault given that the movie gives her very little to do, but even so I can't be all that surprised that her next most famous role was in Timecop.

7/10
User avatar
Merciel
Hipinion Dog Lady
 
Posts: 23165
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: dog dog dog

PreviousNext

Return to Free-For-All

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: all day breakfast, anephric, apostrophe, blendercore, blunder cats, bold man, chairkicker, clownwig, Curling, DasLofGang, Double McDouble, draw, epistrophy, Eyeball Kid, flimsy, Flossed Out, folkface, Frank, fuckles, galactagogue, gambra, Google [Bot], Grumby, guidance, hatertime, Hoxha, hyperbole man, i won a contest, Jake SPEED, jenmichaeljarre, Kev E Fly, klubrick, landspeedrecord, Late Night Tip, lights, lordofdiapers, lostintheair, manunderer, Mister E, Mr. Towel, No Not Now, number none, oh! it's max!, Phil, powderfinger, Pygmalion, Quigley, Quixotic, Rainbow Battle Kid, sevenarts, Shalabi, skith, Slamwich Artist, snuggle, southpaw, strange potion, stranger, tgk, The Fool on the Hill, Tom Cruise, universe, Vacancies, what the schmuck, wong