Classical Music Thread

Jesus christ you have to be kidding me.

Postby cram » Wed Dec 16, 2009 1:49 pm

Lets kick this off
Arvo Pärt - Tabula Rasa (1984)
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Allmusic.com wrote:Arvo Pärt delivers a brief collection of sacred music -- bold, stoic, and sober. His compositions are full of a passionate and melancholy sort of life, a life of deep humility and faith. One of his earliest releases on the ECM label, Tabula Rasa is a richly woven tapestry of string arrangements, and a good introduction to his work. The album opens with Fratres -- a signature piece for the composer that would have many re-tellings over the years. Here, ECM veteran Keith Jarrett's piano has a rich dialogue with Gidon Kremer's violin; both musicians traverse the chilled waters of Estonia with urgent staccato and contemplative grace. The piece returns later in more ominous quietude, this time whispered out by the 12 cellists of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. This arrangement is much more meditative in nature, more reverent perhaps to Pärt's deity, and essentially the centerpiece of the album. Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten is a loving, almost melodramatic tribute to a composer that Pärt wished very much to meet (though never did). Cellos and violins drip tears that cascade ever downward to a chord which seems to close infinitely, resonating with the peal of a distant church bell. Pärt's final selection, Tabula Rasa, follows much of the same bittersweet territory as what came before it, though it does encompass greater degrees of discord at the offset. As the 25-minute-long piece settles into night, icy clusters of prepared piano fall between the exchange of two violins and chamber orchestra to invoke feelings of sacrifice, mystery, and deliverance. This is a modest but pivotal recording to own -- the essence of Arvo Pärt.
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Postby glass_candle_grenade » Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:54 pm

Two weeks ago I gave Spiegel im Spiegel from Alina a try on piano since I've heard it in so many films, was a totally different playing experience. There is just a minimalist notation ("durata 9-10 mins") and you can play it right on the first try. Still it sounds so beautiful and you can interpret endlessly

Been listening to some Debussy lately, hated children's corner when I was 16 but now I can't stop listening to Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum, but never will I be able to play it that fast http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQMOpgjPDQo&hd=1

this is like perfect winter music http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fniPt86r-BY&hd=1
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Postby Slothropian » Wed Dec 16, 2009 4:07 pm

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This album, which catapulted Polish composer Henryk Gorecki to into the international spotlight, takes texts born in pain and turns them into statements of affirmation through the use of music that ebbs and flows in mystic minimalism. The clear voice of soprano Dawn Upshaw, singing the Polish texts, is a large part of the success of this particular recording, but the music, contemporary without either dissonance or movie-music mawkishness, clarifies and uplifts the words. This is a moving and essential element of the modern repertoire.



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Postby cram » Wed Dec 16, 2009 4:18 pm

Tried out some Wim Mertens recently.
I really like Struggle for pleasure, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r93Oayq09Lk
but a lot of what I've heard is way too 'over the top'
I'd like to know that other people think of him, since maybe I'm just listening to the wrong stuff...


for reference this is what i mean by 'over the top': http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6qgssTqbOE
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Postby glass_candle_grenade » Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:03 pm

Cram Chowder wrote:Tried out some Wim Mertens recently.
I really like Struggle for pleasure, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r93Oayq09Lk
but a lot of what I've heard is way too 'over the top'
I'd like to know that other people think of him, since maybe I'm just listening to the wrong stuff...


ha this is good pop classical stuff, first minute reminded me a lot of Yann Tiersen, the slow beginning and then the arpeggios http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyCRJmerW1Q

Here's some technically demanding Ligeti http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp-HPqXm3m4
His "Études pour piano" books 1-3 are ace.

You have already heard him if you watched the shining or 2001: space odyssey
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Postby beausoleil » Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:24 pm

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Karlheinz Stockhausen: Kontakte (1960)

Forget about the theory, forget about the once-utopian dreams of giving music the prestige of scientific objectivity, and just listen to the stream of electronic burps, squawks, whizzes, and--toward the conclusion--serene cloudlike mists as they metamorphose. It's a stunning soundscape and document of a particularly potent period of revolution in modern music.


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Postby cram » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:05 pm

Erik Satie - 3 Gymnopedies and Other Piano Works
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Low-key piano compositions. You'll probably recognize the first track from Man on Wire (among other things).
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Postby glass_candle_grenade » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:39 pm

Thanks, I've only heard the Diego Dini-Ciacci performance, and because the 1st Gymnopédie isn't hard to play it's always cool to hear some other interpretation. I mean even the guy from Coldplay can play the Gnossienne http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sP6MViENWG8
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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:40 pm

oh look part and satie in a hipinion classical music thread
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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:41 pm

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Claude Debussy-LA MER, PRELUDES & NOCTURNES (1905, 1959 recording by Eugene Ormandy & the Philadelphia Orchestra)
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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:42 pm

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Ludwig van Beethoven-THE LATE STRING QUARTETS (The Takács Quartet, 2005)
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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:42 pm

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Ludwig van Beethoven-SYMPHONIES NO. 5 & 7 (Carlos Kleiber & Weiner Philharmoniker, 1975)
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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:43 pm

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Ludwig van Beethoven-The Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 (Ferenc Fricsay & the Berlin Philharmonic, 1958)
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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:44 pm

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Krzysztof Penderecki-MATRIX 5 (1994 compilation w/ Polish Radio Orchestra)
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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:50 pm

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Copland: Red Pony & Britten: Sinfonia da Requiem (Vinyl Rip)

I ripped this awhile ago so the sound isn't great, but it's pretty interesting. Based on the Steinbeck story.

The Red Pony is a suite drawn from the sound track Copland wrote in 1948 for a film version of John Steinbeck's story of the same name. The heroes of the tale are Jody, a ten-year old boy, and his colt, on a Western ranch. As in Copland's popular ballet scores, Rodeo and Billy The Kid, the music is a direct evocation of the rural West - a tone poem of prairie life. The suite is arranged in six movements:
1. Morning On The Ranch: A fanfare-like opening suggests daybreak in a land of vast, open horizons. The tempo quickens with the bustle of the morning chores. The fanfare theme returns as the sun stands high in the sky.
2. The Gift: A tender, dreamlike passage suggests Jody's hushed gratitude as his father tells him that the new pony is to be his own. For a while, Jody and the pony caper about jubilantly. Then the horse is quietly led back to its stable.
3. Dream March And Circus Music: Deep in daydreams, Jody imagines himself astride his steed, leading an army of knights. Yet in Jody's mind, the procession of the armored warriors sounds rather like a parade of cowboys. Next, Jody pictures himself as a circus-master, whip-cracking his pony around the ring. The circus band - like those Jody has heard in nearby towns - plays woefully off-tune.
4. Walk To The Bunkhouse: Billy Buck, an old cow-hand at the ranch, is Jody's special pal. They swap laconic comments as they amble over to the bunkhouse while the bassoon, bass fiddles and bass clarinet punctuates the lopsided rhythm of the cowboy's gait.
5. Grandfather's Story: Jody's grandfather reminisces about the old days when he led a wagon train "clear across the plains to the coast."
6. Happy Ending: The last movement of the suite is a sprightly reprise of the folk-like themes of the opening section. It logically serves as a musical finale but is unconnected with the plot of Steinbeck's story, in which Jody gains early maturity by learning to accept the death of his pony through illness.
The Red Pony typifies all the elements that are widely recognized as being distinctly American in Copland's style. Some of the thematic material derives from such homegrown forms of music as the hoedown and the hymns of various American sects. His rhythms sparkle with a syncopated vitality clearly influenced by jazz. There is a nostalgic, open-air feeling about Copland's harmonies, and even his lyric flights retain a cool sharpness through the glint of dissonance.
***
Britten's Sinfonia da Requiem has a strange history. In 1940, the composer received a rather mysterious inquiry from a high cultural official of the British government: Would he be willing to write a special symphony for a celebration in honor of a foreign ruler? Britten saw no objection as long as the work would not be expected to contain any jingoism or other forms of national blatancy. Eventually it turned out that the commission for this special music had come from Japan. The new symphony was to be part of the festivities marking the 2,600th anniversary of the founding of a present Japanese dynasty, which had been established in 660 B.C. by the emperor Jimmu Tenno.
In 1940, Japan was embroiled in a long and cruel war against China, and Britten, a lifelong pacifist, accepted the commission with the idea of finding some way of speaking his conscience through his music. In choosing three sections of the Requiem - the Mass for the Dead - as titles for the symphony's three movements, he hoped to evoke a sense of terror at the ghastliness of war. His outline, when first submitted to the Japanese authorities, was readily approved. But when the score was completed, it nearly resulted in an international incident. The Japanese sent a furious note to England through the Japanese embassy in London, protesting that the young English composer had insulted the Mikado by submitting a work based on Christian principles and liturgy.
With the help of his friend, the poet W.H. Auden, Britten drafted a suitable reply for dispatch to Japan. Yet there was no further word from the Japanese. Soon after, bombs fell on Pearl Harbor and all communications were severed. Britten's Sinfonia da Requiem, as an individual artist's plea for peace, thus casts a sad and ironic sidelight on the dark history of our war-ridden era.
The opening movement of the work - Lacrymosa - is heavy with grief and ominous with foreboding. It is followed by an agitated, acerbic movement - Dies Irae - depicting the desperate turmoil and anguish that is the wrath of God. The symphony closes on a quiet lament - Requiem Aeternam - imploring eternal rest for the dead. The three movements are played without interruption.


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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:52 pm

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Grofé: Grand Canyon Suite (Vinyl Rip)

Another vinyl rip, and again it's not so good. But I doubt you could ever find a rip online better of this particular performance. Not masterful, but pretty fun.

The first of the five movements is SUNRISE. Dawn appears over the desert, heralded by a soft roll on the kettledrums, followed by a series of chords played by the woodwinds. The main theme - initiated by the English horn and taken up by the other instruments - depicts the full brilliance of the breaking day.

Next, vast and mysterious: PAINTED DESERT. The movement opens with a strange, evocative theme played by bass clarinet and viola. Woodwinds and piano emerge in weird harmony, then - as the bright rays of the sun flood across the sands - we hear a contrasting melody of lyric quality.

ON THE TRAIL - the most popular movement of the Suite - introduces a traveler and his burro. The bray of the burro is heard, then the graceful rhythmic melody of his hoofbeats. Against this background emerges the contrapuntal melody of the cowboy's song. The traveler sights a lone cabin (the celeste plays a suggestion of an old music box), stops there briefly, then travels on.

As evening overtakes the day, there is SUNSET. Now animal calls are heard from the distant rim of the canyon. The horns open the movement, introducing the main theme played on bells and violins. The theme is developed in turn by oboes and violins, by woodwinds and violins, by cellos and horns, by horns and flutes. Finally a fading repetition of the opening calls of the horns echoes into the now-fallen night.

CLOUDBURST is the final and most pictorial movement of the Suite, encompassing the whole range of a violent storm: the ominous approach, lightning, thunder, torrential rain - then a sudden calm and the emergence of the moon from behind the clouds. Grofé uses all the resources of the orchestra to portray the battle of the elements - then after the storm is over, builds a final, gradual crescendo that forms the climax of the entire suite.

The Grand Canyon Suite was first performed in 1931 by Paul Whiteman's orchestra. It received wide critical recognition as an outstanding achievement in American music, and it was enthusiastically greeted in Europe. Today it is an established favorite, performed by distinguished orchestras here and abroad. In this recording one of the most distinguished - The Oslo Philharmonic - gives a particularly rich and rewarding interpretation.


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Postby beausoleil » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:53 pm

zamboni wrote:Image
Krzysztof Penderecki-MATRIX 5 (1994 compilation w/ Polish Radio Orchestra)
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One of my all time favs.
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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:55 pm

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We may feel we have always known these songs, and in a sense we have. The first hearing will not seem the first, though we will remember it for that slow shock of familiarity, how it awakens memories-those we knew we had, and those we did not. This is part of these songs' silence, that they make no noise of intrusion.

We feel we have always known these songs, in part because their musical language is immediately recognizable. It is the language of major-minor harmony (mostly minor) and, more particularly, of the nineteenth-century song with piano. It is a language that belongs, indeed, to former times. Here is what sounds like a folksong arrangement (No. 5). Here are turns of phrase (in No. 8, for example) that Tchaikovsky might have been proud of. Here, in so many piano arpeggios ad even in direct harmonic correspondences, are recollections of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata, trailing with them the whole history of the nocturne. Here, reappearing again and again, from the third song onwards, is the gently rocking 6/8 rhythm of the berceuse. We are being sung to as we have been sung to before. We are being offered music that will go with us into the darkening. We are being comforted with lullabies.

Russian speakers will feel they have always known these songs for the special reason that the poems are among the most familiar in the language. For all of us, what we have always known, beyond the songs, is this voice. Singing almost always at a pianissimo-the marking on each song is sotto voce, and only in the Chorale (No. 21) does the dynamic level rise above the occasional mp-it is a voice that is not declaiming to an audience but singing into our ear. It is the voice of a grandfather, passing on the songs of generations.

With it is the piano, its close companion, now slowing a little, now pressing forward, breathing with the voice. "The singing voice should not be at a remove from the piano," the composer notes, "but must proceed as it were from the depth of the piano sound, now emerging, now sinking. It is as if one were hearing singing that is inside itself."

And again: "All the songs must be sung very calmly, with a light, transparent, bright sound, restrained in expression, without psychological exaggeration." The singer is not an actor, projecting the balm of Baratynsky or Lermontov, a legend from Keats or Shelley, Pushkin's solitariness or Shevchenko's farewell, the bitterness of Mandelstam or the delight of Tyutchev, the troubled aftermath in Yesenin or the assurance of Zhukovsky. The singer is here not to display emotion but to remind us of these songs we have always known, and of how melancholy and consolation go hand in hand.

Yet though we may feel we have always known these songs, we have not. They are new-startlingly new for 1974-1977, when composers in the Soviet Union were stretching boundaries. Heard in the context of other music from this period of official constraint's exhaustion-Sofia Gubaidulina's Offertorium, Alfred Schnittke's First Concerto Grosso, Galina Ustvolskaya's Composition No. 3, Arvo Part's Fratres - these songs make no claims of innovation (another aspect of their silence), in which respect they are indeed innovatory. Just when the stylistic features of Russian Romanticism were no longer being forcibly imposed, here they were, redoubled - and not by a stalwart of state music but by a young avantgardist. Just when composers could at last make big personal statements in public, here was one letting the past express itself, in the private dimensions of whispered song.

If we feel we have always known these songs, that is because they speak so much from long ago, because the singer is imparting nothing new. In his quiet retrieval, though, he is making everything new, for what we hear is his remembering. All the songs are slow; they have the pace of reflection and reverberation. They also have the space, the sense of cavernous chamber, be it only the body of the piano, within which we hear as harmony and melody the upper resonances of the extreme bass that is almost always in play. Just as the singer is asked to perform each song sotto voce, so the pianist is requested to keep the una corda pedal down through nearly every number - the single exception being, once more, the Chorale - but the fluctuating use of the sustaining pedal, also marked, keeps the resonances clear and fresh. Each song is the echo of a song, the memory.

Do we still feel we have always known these songs? The sotto voce delivery not only gives them an aura of intimacy and inheriting, it also leaves the singer naked, without the support of his training. And with this naked voice he has to cover a range of two octaves - to venture, even if the centre is solidly in a baritone's middle register, into both lower and, in particular, high regions, where the sound is bound to be impure. The resulting hazardous, tenuous communication is there by design. This is fragile music, requiring the utmost delicacy and candour from its performers.

How can we then feel we have always known these songs? The singer is placed under strain - freely places himself under strain, to search. Only one melody is immediately found: that of the "Ukrainian folksong". No. 5, a regular tune in a straightforward tonality, D natural minor. (Twenty years later the composer adapted this piece to make the middle movement of his Requiem.) Otherwise melodies stray, and end without finding their way back to the keynote, leaving the piano to complete the return or, more likely, continue the straying, until the music is overtaken by deceleration. For a while the piano rarely provides more than the briefest possible introduction, almost always there is a postlude.

So it cannot be that we have always known these songs, for most of them are still emerging, through seemingly improvised delays and changes. Often there are subtle adjustments from verse to verse - and strophic form is the norm. Even No. 5 has this feeling of tentativeness despite certainty, trying different treatments of the same basic motifs. In the postludes such self-exploration is continued to the point of self-dissolve, out of which the next song can begin. And the cycle as a whole has its postlude in the five concluding songs, among which the Chorale - almost symmetrically balancing No. 5 - presents the essential harmonies in crystalline form. For, magically distinct as many of the melodies are, they share fundamental traits, almost as if all were versions of one song.

If we have always known these songs, this may be the reason, that we know their source. It is that one song, the song we thought had been lost.


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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:56 pm

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Ars Nova Ensemble & Percurama Percussion Ensemble-TERRY RILEY'S IN C (2007)
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Steve Reich-MUSIC FOR 18 MUSICIANS (1978 / 2007 GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE)
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MUSIC FOR 18 MUSICIANS (NONESUCH 1996)
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Steve Reich-DRUMMING (1971)
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Postby glass_candle_grenade » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:56 pm

Does anyone have some new complexity, maybe Michael Finnissy? I've only found these yt http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUuRH8HCGYI http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sMVrmnufPo
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Postby c-p » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:56 pm

this is great. i will be uping some cd's tonight
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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 9:57 pm

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f you haven’t yet encountered the music of Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov, then it’s time you did; he seems to have been writing his ‘postludes’ for symphonic musical history for a good twenty years. Silvestrov calls his orchestral works ‘symphonic poetry’, or sometimes ‘metasymphonies’ where time flows in a wholly different way. He’s not alone in this, of course: other contemporary composers such as Pärt, Gorecki, Tavener, Vasks and Rautavaara are capable of warping the passage of time, yet Silvestrov has his own fully-saturated musical language, plus a post-Mahlerian sense of scale and all-encompassing humanity.

Silvestrov’s Fifth Symphony has already been recorded several times, becoming something of a cult hit in the East thanks to a now-deleted Melodiya recording. There was a fourteen year gap before the Sixth Symphony was finished in 2000: a five movement work described in the notes as ‘a living tissue of sounds, charged with deep dynamic forces, [which] sparkles and breathes as if bathed in sunlight or caressed by gusts of wind.’ I like that…except that it gives you no real idea of the yawning chasm from which the work seems to drag itself, shuddering and groaning towards that light.

So…is the Sixth Symphony about anything? The composer talked in an interview about its ‘atmosphere of imminent disaster’, and with hindsight that seems prescient: Silvestrov’s musicologist wife Larissa died unexpectedly just after he’d finished the first draft in 1996, and he included a coded cipher of his wife’s name in the final bars.
The notes refer to the opening of the symphony as ‘primordial chaos’…churning, bass-heavy chords that rumble ominously as piano notes and vibrato-less strings pierce the gloom like shards of shattered glass. Threads begin to appear, strands of melodic DNA being pulled from the slime to shimmer on the surface of this dark pool…until droplets of pizzicato at the start of the second movement send ripples to rouse the grumbling monster in the depths. The brass becomes dominant, until a dense string chord insists on silence, and the melodic material emerges on the violins, intact for the first time. The multi-stranded layers of constantly shifting sound dwindle to a roll of timpani and a single, hushed cello.

Then comes the massive middle movement, 25 minutes long, dwarfing those around it, evoking (and quoting) the famous Adagietto from Mahler’s Fifth Symphony. Silvestrov constructs a breathtakingly beautiful centrepiece for his symphony, extrapolating on the sighing strings and the sense of timelessness that were already there in Mahler’s original, with a cascading string sound that would have Mantovani doffing his hat in respect. Then there’s stillness; an Intermezzo that’s all shimmering surface, glistening with harp, piano, celesta, and harmonics from the upper strings…a ghostly vision, slowly fading as tendrils of mist envelope the concluding chord. But all the time we’ve been making a slow, delicate descent…and when the brass growls and woodwind shrieks assail us at the start of the finale, the music is overpowered by a sense of horror, and desperate loss. We end where we began, with the last melodic remnants dissolving into infinite blackness.

Given Silvestrov’s personal history, his Sixth Symphony could feel as though it’s all about him, yet he transcends the autobiographical in a work that encompasses us all. The playing is superb, capturing the most delicate hues and gentlest whispers of the score, and the immaculate recording provides the inky blackness from which the music emerges and into which, at the end, it decays. Like so much Silverstov, you don’t have to know how or why it works to be deeply affected by it. It feels simple, yet it obviously isn’t; it’s profoundly beautiful, timeless, and unforgettable.


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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:00 pm

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In autumn 1956, while still a student at the Moscow Conservatory, I began this violin concerto. I called it my Opus 1 - the last opus number I have hitherto assigned. The concerto was not reworked until 1963, and then to an apparent continuation with the quite different Violin Sonata No. 1 - but everything written until then was wrong, and has remained so.

Above all, I see a desperate striving to find myself in the work of this concerto. This quest as very rarely successful, indeed only on occasions - the unison theme at the beginning, the climax in the third movement, the final coda. It was a sound world of Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov, overshadowed by Shostakovich and adorned with the orchestral conventions of the day. But there was also a tiny breath of everything that was to come later, and for this reason it should remain, with all the faults of a first violin concerto...
-Alfred Schnittke

The Concerto No. 2 for Violin and Chamber Orchestra was written in 1966 at the behest of Mark Lubotsky, who also gave the first performanec on the occasion of the Jyvaskyla Festival in Finaland that year, conducted by Friedrich Cerha.

The concept which lies behind the work comes from a certain drama of tone colours: the soloist and the strings are treated in a linear, thematic manner whilst the wind and percussion are aggressively punctual and aleatoric. The double bass has the special role of a caricatured "anti-soloist". The sequence of several contrasting episodes shows clear signs of traditional formal structures: solo cadenza at the outset, exposition of the two sound spheres, Adagio episode, development climax, recapitulation, coda-finale.

A chromatic twelve-tone row serves as the thematic foundation, but there is nevertheless a center of melodic gravity, the constantly returning note G, which sometimes leads to an illusion of tonality, especially at the beginning and the end of the work.
-Alfred Schnittke.


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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:00 pm

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Karlheinz Stockhausen-STIMMUNG (1968)
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Philip Glass-GLASSWORKS (1982)
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Harry Partch-DELUSION OF THE FURY (1969, 1999 compilation)
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Morton Feldman-ROTHKO CHAPEL & WHY PATTERNS? (1972 / 1978)
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Giacinto Scelsi-AION/PFHAT/KNOX-OM-PAX (1988)
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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:03 pm

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Concerto No. 3 for Violin and Chamber Orchestra (1978)
This work was originally intended to form part of a programme in which Hindemith's Piano Concerto and the Chamber Concerto of Alban Berg were to be played. This determined the orchestral forces of my piece, which sum up those of the other two pieces but which also influenced the sound concept of my concerto: thirteen wind instruments and only four strings produce an inequality of weight. I found a solution to this problem in saving the strings for the third movement, where they enter for the first time and replace the wind sound towards the end of the composition.

The title original planned, Canticum canticorcum, which I eventually renounced since I am against programmatic explicitness, found a certain reflection in the concerto's musical language (for example, in the soloist's initial cadenza). But there are also quite different influences at work - those of Russion Orthodox church music (in the final chorale of the first and third movements) and German Romanticism (the forest music at the beginning of the third movement which, despite the horn fifths and fluctuations between major and minor, is not a quotation from Schubert or Mahler). And the atonal idiom also leads naturally on occasion to twelve-note themes, but never to twelve-tone rows. the combination of these tonal spheres is not subject to any constructional principle: I merely followed my ear's commands.

I have long been preoccupied by the opposition of the tonal and the atonal. In this work I tried to construct a unified system of intonations linking the two soundworlds organically - that is, not only through the contrasting effects of night and day but also by means of the morning and evening transitions and the ever-present play of shadows and colour modulation. Atonality can be reached from any point in tonality (and vice versa).

The Violin Concerto's three movements follow the scheme of double contrasts (slow-fast-slow) and are played without a break. The solo part makes no virtuoso demands on the soloist and is predominantly melodically conceived. The first performance took place January 1979 in the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory.
-Alfred Schnittke

Concerto No. 4 for Violin and Orchestra (1984)
My Fourth Violin Concerto, a commission from the Berlin Festival, is dedicated to my dear friend Gidon Kremer, as a sign of my great admiration and most heartfelt thanks. Gidon has contributed decisively to the spread of my works, both through countless performances and also by inspiring and stimulating other musicians. For this reason the musical material on this four-movement concerto is taken from monograms of Gidon Gremer and of myself - and in the last movement also of three other kindred souls, Edison Denisov, Sofia Gubaidulina and Arvo Part. It is not, however, a constructed Babel (except for the perpetuum mobile passacaglia in the second movement); rather it is an attempt to create a melodic tension both between one note and another and also between notes and rests, with free application of techniques both 'new' and 'old'. Two beautiful plush melodies (the first running through the entire piece as a fatum banale, the second appearing as a false relief in the third movement) are merely two 'corpses decorated with make-up'. On a few occasions (for example the 'cadenza visuale', second movement) a peep is ventured behind the curtain into the soundless, hypnotic music Hereafter - into the world of silent sound (otherwise called 'rest'). But these are only moments, brief attempts to fly; the foundering descent back into the world of sound is inevitable. Or is it?
-Alfred Schnittke


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hey look
 
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Postby beausoleil » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:04 pm

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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:05 pm

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Terry Riley-RAINBOW IN CURVED AIR (1967)
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Arnold Dreyblatt and The Orchestra of Excited Strings-PROPELLERS IN LOVE (1988)
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Pascal Rogé-CLAUDE DEBUSSY's PRELUDES I & II (2005)
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Postby hey look » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:06 pm

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some of my favorite vocal music from one of my favorite vocalists. probably not going to find much of a crowd here, but i like it. its art song things you know.
For the 150th anniversary of the birth of Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg in 1993, it was inevitable that Deutsche Grammophon would release a disc of his songs sung by the magnificent Swedish mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter -- just as it was inevitable that the label would re-release von Otter's disc for the 100th anniversary of Grieg's death in 2007. That's alright: this is one of the truly immortal discs that should always be available. Why? Because it contains all the well-known Grieg songs -- "Spring," "Love," "Seduction," "Two Brown Eyes," and "I Love You" -- and it also contains 20 other Grieg songs that are nowhere near as well-known but easily at the same musical level. Beyond the repertoire, there's also von Otter's splendid voice -- rich and creamy with a well-rounded upper register, a throbbing lower register, and total command over every aspect of technique -- and von Otter's soulful interpretations -- warmly affectionate interpretations with sympathy for the songs' sentimental emotionality and a deep appreciation of their acute sensuality. Accompanied by pianist Bengt Forsberg, her long-time on-stage partner, von Otter's recital is one of the fundamental discs that belongs on any Grieg shelf and anyone who loves late Romantic art songs should hear it. By the time this disc was recorded in 1992, Deutsche Grammophon had mastered the new digital technology and the digital sound here is as clear, light, and as effortlessly immediate as the best stereo recordings. No higher praise is possible.


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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:08 pm

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The Hilliard Ensemble-PÉROTIN (2000)
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Postby zamboni » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:22 pm

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THE MIRROR OF NARCISSUS: SECULAR SONGS BY GUILLAUME DE MACHAUT (1993)
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György Ligeti-MUSICA RICERCATA (1953)
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Franz Liszt-DANTE SYMPHONY s. 109 (1856, 1986 recording of James Conlon & the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra)
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Franz Liszt-FAUST SYMPHONY s. 108 (1857, 1993 recording of Riccardo Chailly & the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra)
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