what are you reading right now?

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby the upland trout » Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:55 pm

I love that everyone is reading Ice. I want to reread it so I think I'm going to trick my science fiction reading group into selecting it.
Last edited by the upland trout on Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby the upland trout » Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:56 pm

Has anyone read this?

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Postby Melville » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:24 pm

the upland trout wrote:Finally finished my reread of:

Image


Nice. Took me years to get through, and I found the earlier sections a lot more compelling than the later ones, but at times it felt like the unveiling of the secret truth of the universe (or at least Hegel's idea of that).

I've been slowly going through Peter Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang. It's a highly entertaining, tightly constructed character study, and I love the rambling, colorful narration. Kind of feels a bit lightweight though, considering the themes of police oppression and power-through-land.

I also started reading the latest translation (Christine Donougher's) of Les Miserables with my wife. I've only ever read a severely abridged version when I was a kid, and my wife discovered that the translation she read was lightly abridged as well.
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Postby the upland trout » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:40 pm

Yeah my comprehension of the book takes a nosedive with the Reason section and only gradually recovers.
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Postby Sobieski » Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:38 pm

the upland trout wrote:
It's not a hard question to answer. Hegel comes up everywhere in the stuff I work on, so I figure I better get him figured out. Plus the whole period of German philosophy and culture between Kant and Hegel is super interesting. Finally I have a thing for difficult books.

yeah I find that whole period really interesting as well, though I'm more of a Schopenhauer stan. It's almost like the germans got intoxicated by self-consciousness for awhile
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Postby winjer » Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:16 pm

the upland trout wrote:Has anyone read this?



from page 851 (of thread not book)

Eyeball Kid wrote:I mentioned earlier I'm reading Patrick White's The Vivisector. It's good, but I just had to share this howler of a similie I recently came across.

As she swept him off, she was all flesh, his appetite for which was satisfied: his only remaining pleasure lay in the sallow tones of her skin, and the texture of her breasts, like those bland cheeses which reward the eye rather than the tongue.


:?
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Postby dvr » Sat Dec 16, 2017 12:36 am

dvr wrote:Is Michael Chricton's Timeline okay?


it's not good.

but two people recommended it to me within a week so i feel compelled to finish
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Postby the upland trout » Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:14 am

winjer wrote:
the upland trout wrote:Has anyone read this?



from page 851 (of thread not book)

Eyeball Kid wrote:I mentioned earlier I'm reading Patrick White's The Vivisector. It's good, but I just had to share this howler of a similie I recently came across.

As she swept him off, she was all flesh, his appetite for which was satisfied: his only remaining pleasure lay in the sallow tones of her skin, and the texture of her breasts, like those bland cheeses which reward the eye rather than the tongue.


:?


Haha. Hmmmm.
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Postby Plainsong » Sat Dec 16, 2017 1:34 am

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Postby tarantula » Sat Dec 16, 2017 2:07 am

j.l. borges, a universal history of infamy

moved recently and this turned up out of my storage boxes

hadn't looked at it in 10 years and it makes more sense now
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Postby Melville » Sat Dec 16, 2017 4:47 am

the upland trout wrote:Yeah my comprehension of the book takes a nosedive with the Reason section and only gradually recovers.

Definitely. The stuff on (self-)consciousness is a lot more relatable, both to personal experience and to later phenomenology. It also often becomes hard to parse what "stratum" of existence he was talking about -- from an individual up to humanity as a whole. Though that leads to a lot of thoughts about the mirroring of processes between different strata, which becomes one of the most fascinating things about the book.

What is your research on, if you don't mind me asking?
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Postby ahungbunny » Sat Dec 16, 2017 7:50 pm

chimp wrote:i always post this but i'm super jealous of your classic SF library theta


if you or theta (or anyone else) ever find yourself in minneapolis, uncle hugo's bookstore has the most ridiculous collection of old SF paperbacks i've ever seen. great shop to kill a few hours in
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Postby cooly » Sun Dec 17, 2017 12:11 am

Melville wrote:
the upland trout wrote:Yeah my comprehension of the book takes a nosedive with the Reason section and only gradually recovers.

Definitely. The stuff on (self-)consciousness is a lot more relatable, both to personal experience and to later phenomenology. It also often becomes hard to parse what "stratum" of existence he was talking about -- from an individual up to humanity as a whole. Though that leads to a lot of thoughts about the mirroring of processes between different strata, which becomes one of the most fascinating things about the book.

What is your research on, if you don't mind me asking?

the reason section only makes any sense if you've studied kant pretty thoroughly. it's the section of the book that is most directly in engagement with another system, so this reaction makes sense.

i could recommend some secondary lit on the phg if anyone is curious. ended up working on this book a lot in undergrad and grad school though a lot of it is fading away now.
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Postby abs » Sun Dec 17, 2017 12:27 am

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finally
☽ ☾ ● ◯ ● ☽ ☾

thistle in the kiss
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Postby the upland trout » Sun Dec 17, 2017 2:02 pm

Melville wrote:
the upland trout wrote:Yeah my comprehension of the book takes a nosedive with the Reason section and only gradually recovers.

Definitely. The stuff on (self-)consciousness is a lot more relatable, both to personal experience and to later phenomenology. It also often becomes hard to parse what "stratum" of existence he was talking about -- from an individual up to humanity as a whole. Though that leads to a lot of thoughts about the mirroring of processes between different strata, which becomes one of the most fascinating things about the book.

What is your research on, if you don't mind me asking?


Right now I'm mostly working in STS, disability studies, and environmental philosophy. Very abstractly stated, I'm interested in exploring the technological and ecological dimensions of the construction of disability and ability.

However I am also very interested in the Frankfurt School, leftist/Marxist thought more generally, and Adorno in particular. But I also feel that my grasp of this material is a bit too uncertain to comfortably make use of it in my current work. Reading Hegel is a way of hopefully getting more comfortable with all of this.
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Postby the upland trout » Sun Dec 17, 2017 2:04 pm

cooly wrote:
Melville wrote:
the upland trout wrote:Yeah my comprehension of the book takes a nosedive with the Reason section and only gradually recovers.

Definitely. The stuff on (self-)consciousness is a lot more relatable, both to personal experience and to later phenomenology. It also often becomes hard to parse what "stratum" of existence he was talking about -- from an individual up to humanity as a whole. Though that leads to a lot of thoughts about the mirroring of processes between different strata, which becomes one of the most fascinating things about the book.

What is your research on, if you don't mind me asking?

the reason section only makes any sense if you've studied kant pretty thoroughly. it's the section of the book that is most directly in engagement with another system, so this reaction makes sense.

i could recommend some secondary lit on the phg if anyone is curious. ended up working on this book a lot in undergrad and grad school though a lot of it is fading away now.


I'm relatively good with Kant, but it's been a few years since I've last read Critique of Pure Reason.

I'd be interested in some secondary lit recommendations.
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Postby Slamwich Artist » Sun Dec 17, 2017 2:20 pm

Thought this was pretty good
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Been slowly making my way through
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Haaaaa. The got me. I didn't know it was on Satire! Got it. Peeps got jokes. It's cool!
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Postby Kenny » Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:32 am

I'm reading Arthur Whaley's translation of Journey to the West, published as Monkey.

I'm really really loving it, and it makes me want to keep the Traditional Stories going. Can anybody recommend a version of 1001 Nights/Arabian Nights?
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Postby santos l halper » Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:37 am

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just finished reading this, which was phenomenal. some thematic similarities to "the vegetarian" (which is a masterpiece as far as i'm concerned) and a similar level of emotional intensity, but quite different in terms of technique and narrative content. both are strongly recommended.

now onto:

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Postby wollogallu » Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:44 am

finished the new helen dewitt, its just what i wanted it to be

started

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very thankful for ND arcs
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Postby Eyeball Kid » Mon Dec 18, 2017 10:25 am

Now reading:

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Postby cooly » Mon Dec 18, 2017 10:42 am

upland trout, if you're willing to engage with the analytic hegel, brandom's draft of a spirit of trust is interesting, and spends a significant amount of time on the reason section. http://www.pitt.edu/~brandom/spirit_of_trust_2014.html the draft is up on his site (it's not published yet) as a series of MS Word documents, and the section on the expressive conception of agency is probably the relevant one for the reason section.

i don't normally like texts in the 'analytic hegel' tradition because they tend to stay pretty removed from the book itself and normally just explore an idea the author is interested in using a couple lines of hegel as an excuse (pippin is the most guilty of this), but brandom's book explores things a bit more deeply (of course this is partly because the book is so long.) that said, you might be skeptical of its connection to the text. at the very least it's better than pippin, pinkard, and forster as an attempt along these lines. taylor is probably worth mentioning here as another "good book that is debatable in how related it is to the text itself"

i didn't mean to assume you weren't that up on your kant. i guess i just meant that when i was studying the phg that section was the one i had to look the most outside the text for, and it was mostly towards kant and hegel's engagement with other idealists (i.e. the difference essay)

if you're reading it partly out of interest for frankfurt school, you've likely looked at the hyppolite, or thought about doing so, but that's one of the best book-length works on the phenomenology, and it's closely related to your tradition, so it's worth mentioning.

even though it's not directly on the PhG really, i think beatrice longueness's 'hegel's critique of metaphysics' is probably the best book to mention here. it's ostensibly about a small section of the science of logic, but it's the best book i know of on hegel's dialectical logic, and it does a wonderful job characterizing the relationship between kant and hegel and their conceptions of reason, which is of course important for that chapter.
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Postby plashy » Mon Dec 18, 2017 10:46 am

wollogallu wrote:finished the new helen dewitt, its just what i wanted it to be


the what now?
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Postby wollogallu » Mon Dec 18, 2017 10:57 am

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Postby mystery meat » Mon Dec 18, 2017 4:16 pm

The Big Clock owns, film adaptation is really great too
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Postby tolka » Mon Dec 18, 2017 4:22 pm

two debuts, one more accomplished but the other more inspired. both good!

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beautiful. some passages were so relatable that i had to put the book down for a while, although others would have benefitted from a little tightening, or even being dropped.

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whereas this was lean and thematically tight. very polished and relevant.
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Postby the upland trout » Mon Dec 18, 2017 7:21 pm

cooly wrote:upland trout, if you're willing to engage with the analytic hegel, brandom's draft of a spirit of trust is interesting, and spends a significant amount of time on the reason section. http://www.pitt.edu/~brandom/spirit_of_trust_2014.html the draft is up on his site (it's not published yet) as a series of MS Word documents, and the section on the expressive conception of agency is probably the relevant one for the reason section.

i don't normally like texts in the 'analytic hegel' tradition because they tend to stay pretty removed from the book itself and normally just explore an idea the author is interested in using a couple lines of hegel as an excuse (pippin is the most guilty of this), but brandom's book explores things a bit more deeply (of course this is partly because the book is so long.) that said, you might be skeptical of its connection to the text. at the very least it's better than pippin, pinkard, and forster as an attempt along these lines. taylor is probably worth mentioning here as another "good book that is debatable in how related it is to the text itself"

i didn't mean to assume you weren't that up on your kant. i guess i just meant that when i was studying the phg that section was the one i had to look the most outside the text for, and it was mostly towards kant and hegel's engagement with other idealists (i.e. the difference essay)

if you're reading it partly out of interest for frankfurt school, you've likely looked at the hyppolite, or thought about doing so, but that's one of the best book-length works on the phenomenology, and it's closely related to your tradition, so it's worth mentioning.

even though it's not directly on the PhG really, i think beatrice longueness's 'hegel's critique of metaphysics' is probably the best book to mention here. it's ostensibly about a small section of the science of logic, but it's the best book i know of on hegel's dialectical logic, and it does a wonderful job characterizing the relationship between kant and hegel and their conceptions of reason, which is of course important for that chapter.


I like what I've read of Brandom (which is not much) so I'll check that out. Longuenesse's book also looks great.

Why don't you like about Pippin, Pinkard, etc.? From what I remember from graduate school, I know that Pinkard sorta turns Hegel into a social epistemologist.

And yeah, I have the Hyppolite. I'll be reading it soon.
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Postby madness and chaos » Mon Dec 18, 2017 9:36 pm

gonna start
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on my trip home for Xmas
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Postby adam sampler » Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:32 pm

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mediocre
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Postby dmitry » Tue Dec 19, 2017 12:19 am

finally finished Seeing Like a State. jesus christ, this book could be half as long without losing any clarity or conviction. it's still essential reading, though

which means i can finally pick up death and life of american cities, finally
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