new articles to eat lunch to

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby mascotte » Wed Oct 21, 2020 9:10 am

An intersting piece on Russian microvawe attacks

As the Cold War progressed, both the United States and the Soviet Union raced to find military uses for what came to be called directed energy weapons. American researchers had studied things like beaming words into subjects’ heads—great for psychological warfare—while also researching the thermal aspects of microwaves. Packaged in the right way, researchers theorized, a microwave weapon could be mounted on a truck, where it could cast a beam outward to create an invisible barrier anywhere, anytime, capable of immobilizing any person who got within its range. This research ultimately culminated in the development of a weapon the Pentagon calls an Active Denial System, or ADS. In a video touting its capabilities, the U.S. military boasts that this highly portable weapon can be attached to a military vehicle and used to direct precise beams of electromagnetic radiation at, say, an armed militant in a crowd or a suspicious person approaching a military checkpoint. The beam would instantaneously produce a sensation of heat on the skin, which would trigger a person’s reflex to flee. (This summer, a military official inquired about deploying the technology against American protesters who flooded into the streets of Washington, D.C., to protest police brutality.)

On the other side of the world, the Soviets focused on the non-thermal applications of microwave radiation. A 1976 report compiled by the Pentagon’s intelligence branch, the Defense Intelligence Agency, reviewed Soviet research on the topic. The report detailed Moscow’s investigation of the effects of microwaves on the nervous system. Soviet, and later Russian, scientists found that exposing an animal’s brain to microwaves changed the frequency at which neurons fired. Neurons also became suddenly out of sync with one another. Some brain cells in mice were found to have withered. Nerves became damaged. The radiation also showed the potential to disturb the sacrosanct blood-brain barrier and, according to the DIA, resulted in “the alterations of brain function.” The most common symptoms reported in humans who had been exposed to microwaves for long periods of time sounded familiar: headache, fatigue, perspiration, dizziness, insomnia, depression, anxiety, forgetfulness, and lack of concentration


https://www.gq.com/story/cia-investigation-and-russian-microwave-attacks
User avatar

mascotte
 
Posts: 5986
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:18 pm
Location: Poland

Postby mariko-juku » Wed Oct 21, 2020 11:04 am

ooh. gonna read this now, as i only yesterday learned of this from an NYT article, which i read wide-eyed, mouth agape (this kind of stuff fascinates and terrifies me).
User avatar

mariko-juku
 
Posts: 137
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 5:49 pm

Postby deadwolfbones » Tue Dec 08, 2020 11:53 am

Fascinating stuff about how trees communicate with one another

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/12/02/magazine/tree-communication-mycorrhiza.html
dead was real dumb
User avatar

deadwolfbones
 
Posts: 19057
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:19 pm
Location: indiecision

Postby tea preacher » Fri Jan 01, 2021 8:59 pm

Nice long meditation by Ann Patchett on friendship and death and writing with psilocybin experience as added bonus.

https://harpers.org/archive/2021/01/these-precious-days-ann-patchett-psilocybin-tom-hanks-sooki-raphael/
my regrets look just like texts I shouldn't send
User avatar

tea preacher
 
Posts: 1149
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:37 pm

Postby mascotte » Sat Jan 02, 2021 9:40 am

User avatar

mascotte
 
Posts: 5986
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:18 pm
Location: Poland

Postby mascotte » Thu Jan 07, 2021 3:19 pm

Looks like reading all this will take a while. Incredible job by The Atlantic.

America owes its existence, at least in part, to conspiracy thinking. In the colonies, a theory was born that King George III was plotting the enslavement of all Americans. Even without evidence, this theory helped tip the scales toward revolution.

Yet conspiracism here and around the world has destroyed great institutions, eradicated knowledge, endangered democracy, and ended lives. Now—fueled by the internet, partisan media, and the 45th president of the United States—paranoid thinking is more powerful, and more dangerous, than ever, threatening not just individual facts, but the idea that empirical truth exists at all.

The rise of mainstream conspiracism is the result not just of bad information or bad politics or bad thinking, but of systems built to stoke paranoia and to profit from mistrust. This project is an attempt to illuminate the forces that have created this unreality—and chart a course for how we might feel our way out.


https://www.theatlantic.com/shadowland/

EDIT: I copied all the articles to one document, looks like the paywall is temporarily broken
https://justpaste.it/2lc54
User avatar

mascotte
 
Posts: 5986
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:18 pm
Location: Poland

Postby mascotte » Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:56 pm

Sometimes the most alluring stories we tell are the ones with the details left out. Objects and faces can be prettier in the half light. We see a faint shape and we add the lines and shadows we want. We hear one part of a story and add another part that we hope might be true.

I first learned of the man called Mostly Harmless this past August. A WIRED reader sent a note to my tip line: The body of a hiker had been found in a tent in Florida in the summer of 2018, but scores of amateur detectives, and a few professional ones too, couldn’t figure out who he was. Everyone knew that he had started walking south on the Appalachian Trail from New York a year and a half before. He met hundreds of people on the trail, and seemed to charm them all. He told people he was from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and that he worked in tech in New York. They all knew his trail name, but no one could figure out his real one.

I had just spent three days hiking on and off the Appalachian Trail with my 12-year-old son, and I was pulled in. We live in an age of constant machine surveillance and tracking. Yet somehow Mostly Harmless had escaped the digital dragnet. He had traveled without a phone or an ID. He carried cash and couldn’t be tracked by credit card receipts. His fingerprints weren’t in any database and his image didn’t turn up any results when run through facial recognition software. The authorities in Collier County, Florida, where his body was found, were stumped, but they were certain he had died of natural causes. He must have been smart. He appeared to have been kind. He was handsome in a general, familiar kind of way. It was easy to map a gentle story onto his past.


https://www.wired.com/story/unsettling-truth-mostly-harmless-hiker/
User avatar

mascotte
 
Posts: 5986
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:18 pm
Location: Poland

Previous

Return to Mamma Mia... Here We Go Again....

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Arturo, Christmas Ape, churrokbyme, Eyeball Kid, GonzO))), Google [Bot], Kuboaa, lunatic96, Milk, No Good Advice, Philip Graff , pzadvance, sushi x, tarantula, trampoline and 65 guests