mystery meat's movieverse

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
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Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:42 pm

palmer eldritch wrote:that movie sounds insane

Yeah. Although having seen Monkey Business I'm not sure I need to see Ginger Rogers pretending to be a child again.

We've been meaning to do some DeMille but yeah... it is a bit hard to remember because he just never comes up in anything I read. I've still never seen anything of his.
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Postby Plainsong » Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:44 pm

mystery meat wrote:DeMille is so underrated. he got sideswiped by auteurism somehow. one of the all-time giants and pioneering craftsmen and unbeatable at what he did etc

I can agree with that. I've honestly never seen anything as well composed and lavish as Celopatra so i'm more than excited to watch more of his films.
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Postby Franco » Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:44 pm

One thought I’m left with after watching Journey to Italy was that it was the direct inverse of Brief Encounter, which I also recently watched for the first time. The latter saw two people drawn toward spending every waking moment together while the world and their circumstances ultimately kept them apart. Journey sees a couple looking for any excuse to stay away from each other but it’s their environment, the weight of history, and most of all convenience that brings them back to a union.

One other concept I’m left with is Restraint. The film several times butted right up to the edge of spilling over and being about something greater but Rossellini pulled it back every time. I loved the middle ground achieved between it having the vibe of a vacation but also very much not. Travel often leads to self discovery and you expect that for them, but time and time again you’re reminded that this ain’t leisure and it never quite happens.
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Postby palmer eldritch » Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:48 pm

its a great pic
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Postby John Dark » Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:56 pm

Should I upend my schedule to watch the two Clouzot flicks about to leave MUBI (Le Corbeau and Quay of the Goldsmiths)? I've only seen Wages of Fear before, but I love it.
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Postby palmer eldritch » Tue Dec 18, 2018 11:00 pm

theyre fine but not amazing
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Postby Wrong Titus » Wed Dec 19, 2018 9:37 am

I'll throw some weight behind Le Corbeau, as a nasty psych thriller I thought it was a great precursor to Diabolique (if not Wages of Fear, which is kind of its own insurpassable thing)
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Postby mystery meat » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:20 pm

Image

Pushover | Columbia | Richard Quine | Fred MacMurray / Kim Novak / Dorothy Malone | 1954

similar to Double Indemnity but 40s bone-chilling expressionized shadowverse evil noir is now the 50s noir that’s used to malaise and is now longer shocked by protagonists shaking hands with the devil. Kim Novak is fascinating in this for how vulnerable and real she is, clearly not thrown under the bus as irreparable gangster’s moll or femme fatale fated to death. Quine is a great director and the logistics and rhythm of the film’s second half (who’s stationed where and who’s keeping tabs on whom) are paragons of what we might call dexterity in cinematic technique. highly recommended to all my noir-heads.

Image

Le Trou | Jacques Becker | Michel Constantin / Jean Keraudy / Philippe Leroy |1960

the camaraderie and implicit unquestioned trust among the four prison-mates is the kind of thing you dont really see in movies very often, outside of some friendship-oriented westerns (Rio Bravo chiefly). it has a lot of the fascination with tools and intelligence and procedural cunning that Man Escaped also is and invites comparisons i think, but this is a french penitentiary not a gestapo prison and the prisoners are probably actual gnarly murderers n shit. so i guess what i mean is the prison break in Le Trou is less a holy grail the journey to which is sanctified from the start (not putting down Man Escaped, it’s still the better film, just trying to articulate the distinction). but anyway the coolest thing about this movie is that the fifth dude who joins their cell is clearly the outside organism whose trustworthiness is yet unvalidated. but Becker postpones the reckoning of the inevitable flare-up betrayal so the audience can wallow in unvarnished teamwork and choreography and fleet-footedness. def masterpiece. need to see the Becker deep cuts.

Image

Beau Geste | Paramount | William A. Wellman | Gary Cooper / Ray Milland / Robert Preston / Susan Hayward / Brian Donlevy | 1939

didn’t really care for this, i guess it’s my aversion to Kipling-adjacent colonialist warfare adventure fantasies. this one has some elaborate jewel heist thrown into the mix. typical filmmaking verve from Wellman but it’s kinda like Stingaree, the rollicky adventure mode is just inferior to all the other Wild Bill genres like crime melodramas and the like. c’est la vie.

Image

Born to Dance | MGM | Roy Del Ruth | James Stewart / Eleanor Powell | 1936

of course i watched this in pursuit of Jimmy Stewart completism but then realized it is more justly sought after as a 30s Musical Gem par excellence. though an MGM production, it’s helmed by Roy Del Ruth right after jumping ship from Warners, where his movies always had verve and snap. you can see it here too. it’s a lithe, rhythmic production limned with comedy and buttressed by some really snazzy production design. JStew made so much sense as a musical star, it’s amazing witnessing him in this role. he can camouflage whatever vocal imperfections or lack of dancing know-how with the kind of raw charm that is the stuff of stardom. it’s still so weird to me how quickly MGM slated him for the A-List.

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Holiday Affair | RKO | Don Hartman | Janet Leigh / Robert Mitchum / Wendell Corey | 1949

weirdest role for Mitchum i can imagine, it’s like RKO was a year off from realizing he could never do Van Johnson-style dopey eccentric winning cheer-up holiday garble and that he was irrevocably destined for the gnarliest roles Hollywood has ever had to offer. he still exudes sex and swagger in this — like there’s a definite reason Leigh prefers him to Corey (this guy’s such a dweeb lmao) and it’s not any of the goofy Christmas-mystical reasons the script provides (about the power of miracles and Mitchum being a benevolent pigeon-feeding outcast, blah) — but he’s kinda wasted. Leigh is always great, and especially underrated in her early films imo.

Image

The Diplomatic Pouch | Alexandr Dovzhenko | 1927

some insane camera and lenswork in this, especially in the opening ravishing scene of the courier’s death, but i ultimately tapped out as it became cumbersome with espionage thriller tropes.

Image

Jamaica Inn | Alfred Hitchcock | Charles Laughton / Maureen O’Hara | 1939

i was assured by a close friend that this was a dud but i simply could not believe it given the talent involved. but i should have recalled: Hitchcock and Laughton also teamed up for The Paradine Case, which sucked. and, well, so does this. Laughton is the only interesting character, all-but-mustache-twirling supervillainy, and Maureen O'Hara starts out fiery and resilient but soon dwindles into damsel-in-distress histrionics as the adventure movie mechanics get rustier and creakier until mercifully grinding to a halt.

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Man Wanted | Warner Bros. | William Dieterle | Kay Francis / David Manners/ Andy Devine / Una Merkel | 1932

perfect little pre-code. i’m still discovering Kay Francis but it seems like she’s born for “modern career woman” type roles as they were depicted in the 30s (see also: Female starring Ruth Chatterton). she’s got a soft glacial quality, wise to the world but not yet disenchanted with it, still willing to lay her vulnerabilities on the line in exchange for good ol’ movie romance. Manners is lame as hell but Francis shines all the brighter next to his personalitylessness.

Image

King of Kings | MGM | Nicholas Ray | Jeffrey Hunter / Robert Ryan | 1961

Nicholas Ray completism, Robert Ryan completism. newfound love of Biblical epics. this viewing came at a good time. def clunky at times and Jeffrey Hunter never seems human enough for me, much less a vessel for The Divine. but i kinda liked his orations. i liked Welles’ narration. i liked the sets and the scenery. there’s definitely enough splash and kinesis too, it’s not just from-a-distance picture-postcard staging. i’m pretty sure Ray was zonked out of his mind the whole time. Robert Ryan as John the Baptist should be way cooler than it sounds but it’s all piety cardboard, oh well.
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Postby mellowgold » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:46 pm

mystery meat can u take over for Eddie Muller on "Noir Alley"?

i dont like him!
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Postby mystery meat » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:50 pm

but he's the Czar of Noir!
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Postby mellowgold » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:50 pm

uggggh!!!

u KNOW he has framed posters of The Three Stooges in his "man cave"
wimbledon, strawberries, bubbles, please protect me. happy midsumma, hope you spend it in your heart, everyone is there. bitch.
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Postby Eyeball Kid » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:53 pm

I liked the crucifixion POV cam in King of Kings. Rip Torn was a better Judas here than Harvey Keitel in The Last Temptation of Christ, but Willem Dafoe was the best Jesus in cinematic history, so.
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Postby goldsoundz » Fri Dec 28, 2018 4:47 pm

haha man, jamaica inn is so awful. i remember watching it on a rainy night back when i was first getting into hitchcock and devouring everything i could from him and it felt like it was never gonna end.
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Postby naturemorte » Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:14 pm

i saw eddie muller do a Q&A with carl franklin at noir city last year that was one of the most excruciating things i've ever witnessed. his questions were just loaded with both insane self-regard and totally unacknowledged racist assumptions. "i have a show on TCM, and when I'm at airports, I'm always so surprised when black women approach me saying how much they love my show and how much they love NOIR. Which I think is weird, because NOIR films don't have black people in them. How did you, a black person, get into NOIR?" I hate him so much.

awesome post, mystery meat! you're doing yeoman's work
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Postby mystery meat » Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:50 am

fav flicks watched for first time in 2018

FLESH AND THE DEVIL (Clarence Brown, 1926)
THE LOVE OF JEANNE NEY (G.W. Pabst, 1927)
STREET ANGEL (Frank Borzage, 1928)

HER MAN (Tay Garnett, 1930)
BLESSED EVENT (Roy Del Ruth, 1932)
THE BLACK CAT (Edgar G. Ulmer, 1934)
THE GOOD FAIRY (William Wyler, 1934)
BORN TO DANCE (Roy Del Ruth, 1936)
ANGEL (Ernst Lubitsch, 1937)
DÉSIRÉ (Sacha Guitry, 1937)
PEPE LE MOKO (Julien Duvivier, 1937)

LES VISITEURS DU SOIR (Marcel Carne, 1942)
WENT THE DAY WELL? (Alberto Cavalcanti, 1942)
MARGIE (Henry King, 1946)
IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY (Robert Hamer, 1947)
A SHIP TO INDIA (Ingmar Bergman, 1947)
CORRIDOR OF MIRRORS (Terence Young, 1948)
UNFAITHFULLY YOURS (Preston Sturges, 1948)
THE SMALL BACK ROOM (Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, 1949)

A LIFE OF HER OWN (George Cukor, 1950)
99 RIVER STREET (Phil Karlson, 1953)
THE MAGGIE (Alexander Mackendrick, 1954)
PUSHOVER (Richard Quine, 1954)
SILVER LODE (Allan Dwan, 1954)
I LIVE IN FEAR (Akira Kurosawa, 1955)
PRINCESS YANG KWEI-FEI (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1955)
PUNISHMENT ROOM (Kon Ichikawa, 1956)
WOMAN IN A DRESSING GOWN (J. Lee Thompson, 1957)
THE MUSIC ROOM (Satyajit Ray, 1958)
WARLOCK (Edward Dmytryk, 1959)

LE TROU ( Jacques Becker, 1960)
A WIFE CONFESSES (Yasuzo Masumura, 1961)
REVENGE OF A KABUKI ACTOR (Kon Ichikawa, 1963)
THE ASSASSIN (Masahiro Shinoda, 1964)
SEANCE ON A WET AFTERNOON (Bryan Forbes, 1964)
ZULU (Cyril Endfield, 1964)
FISTS IN THE POCKET (Marco Bellocchio, 1965)
SCATTERED CLOUDS (Mikio Naruse, 1967)
WE STILL KILL THE OLD WAY (Elio Petri, 1967)
WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? (Mike Nichols, 1967)

THE BOSTON STRANGER (Richard Fleischer, 1968)
NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (George A. Romero, 1968)
SHAME (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)

INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN ABOVE SUSPICION (Elio Petri, 1970)
THE MOTHER AND THE WHORE (Jean Eustache, 1973)
EFFI BRIEST (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1974)
THE TAMARIND SEED (Blake Edwards, 1974)
BLUE COLLAR (Paul Schrader, 1978)
DAWN OF THE DEAD (George A. Romero, 1978)

REBELS OF THE NEON GOD (Tsai Ming-Liang, 1992)
CARLITO’S WAY (Brian De Palma, 1993)
THE ADDICTION (Abel Ferrara, 1995)
DEEP CRIMSON (Arturo Ripstein, 1996)
ALL ABOUT MY MOTHER (Pedro Almodovar, 1999)
BELFAST, MAINE (Frederick Wiseman, 1999)

MANDERLAY (Lars von Trier, 2005)
VINCERE (Marco Bellocchio, 2009)

WHIPLASH (Damien Chazelle, 2014)
QUEEN OF EARTH (Alex Ross Perry, 2015)
THE REVENANT (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, 2015)
GOOD TIME (Josh & Ben Safdie, 2017)
PHANTOM THREAD (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2017)
YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE (Lynne Ramsay, 2017)
FIRST REFORMED (Paul Schrader, 2018)
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Postby soft milk » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:12 am

Have you watched what I told you to watch yet
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Postby relevee » Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:53 am

mystery meat wrote:Image

King of Kings | MGM | Nicholas Ray | Jeffrey Hunter / Robert Ryan | 1961

Nicholas Ray completism, Robert Ryan completism. newfound love of Biblical epics. this viewing came at a good time. def clunky at times and Jeffrey Hunter never seems human enough for me, much less a vessel for The Divine. but i kinda liked his orations. i liked Welles’ narration. i liked the sets and the scenery. there’s definitely enough splash and kinesis too, it’s not just from-a-distance picture-postcard staging. i’m pretty sure Ray was zonked out of his mind the whole time. Robert Ryan as John the Baptist should be way cooler than it sounds but it’s all piety cardboard, oh well.

nice, as a rayhead that's enough of an endorsement for me to take a look

what's your personal read on BORN TO BE BAD (1950) or THE SAVAGE INNOCENTS (1960)? those were the first couple of his minor works that jumped out at me as ones i need to see
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Postby mystery meat » Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:23 pm

ragbags idk tbh

alex i can't get past the badness of Savage Innocents (the cheapness of the production, the really bad dubbing) to harvest the things about it that are 'uniquely Ray.' idk he really loses me with that one even though there are cool parts. i've never seen Born to Be Bad, i need to!

also sorry i'm late in keeping this thread up to speed i just broke up with my podcast partner of five years after he emotionally exploded and burned all his bridges in an inferno of self-destruction so i've been reeling n shit.
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Postby mystery meat » Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:25 pm

ragbags if you're talking about spiderverse sorry it takes backseat to beale st and favourite in my getting-my-ass-to-the-theater queue, sorry! i'll try not to miss it tho.
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Postby Plainsong » Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:46 am

mystery meat wrote:ragbags idk tbh

alex i can't get past the badness of Savage Innocents (the cheapness of the production, the really bad dubbing) to harvest the things about it that are 'uniquely Ray.' idk he really loses me with that one even though there are cool parts. i've never seen Born to Be Bad, i need to!

also sorry i'm late in keeping this thread up to speed i just broke up with my podcast partner of five years after he emotionally exploded and burned all his bridges in an inferno of self-destruction so i've been reeling n shit.

Really sorry to hear that mystery meat, just want to say that your podcast was The best I've ever had the chance of listening to, especially in terms of film. You guys introduced me to things I would've never had the knowledge to seek out if it weren't for you guys. Your podcast will be sorely missed.
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Postby Spoilt Victorian Child » Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:56 am

mystery meat wrote:ragbags if you're talking about spiderverse sorry it takes backseat to beale st and favourite in my getting-my-ass-to-the-theater queue, sorry! i'll try not to miss it tho.

I loved The Favourite but please see Spider-Verse in a theater. I only make it to the theater like four times a year and if I could retroactively budget all of those to Spider-Verse I would.
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Postby landspeedrecord » Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:23 am

mystery meat wrote:also sorry i'm late in keeping this thread up to speed i just broke up with my podcast partner of five years after he emotionally exploded and burned all his bridges in an inferno of self-destruction so i've been reeling n shit.

perhaps consider rebranding to the act of seething?

jokes aside, good podcast, sorry to see it go. rip it up and start again!
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Postby palmer eldritch » Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:37 pm

mystery meat wrote:ragbags idk tbh

alex i can't get past the badness of Savage Innocents (the cheapness of the production, the really bad dubbing) to harvest the things about it that are 'uniquely Ray.' idk he really loses me with that one even though there are cool parts. i've never seen Born to Be Bad, i need to!

also sorry i'm late in keeping this thread up to speed i just broke up with my podcast partner of five years after he emotionally exploded and burned all his bridges in an inferno of self-destruction so i've been reeling n shit.


I was gonna say let's all watch BORN TO BE BAD for Ray completism and check back in here but it turns out I already did and forgot
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Postby mystery meat » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:29 pm

Image

Viva Zapata! | Twentieth Century Fox | Elia Kazan | Marlon Brando / Anthony Quinn / Jean Peters | 1952

i liked it. Brando and Kazan did better work elsewhere though. amazing filmmaking serviceable screenplay shit supporting actors.

Image

Blackboard Jungle | MGM | Richard Brooks | Glenn Ford / Sidney Poitier / Louis Calhern | 1955

need to write a longform piece on the shitness of this, it's monstrous, the most morally misguided shit i've ever seen. there are so many scenes with Margaret Hayes getting ogled and catcalled by the sensationalized switchblade-unsheathing inner-city toughs as the hot teacher, with Louis Calhern as the staff cynic (who talks about them like they're animals) to ask her if she's "dressing like that" to attract "certain kind of attention (i forget the exact problematic innuendo but it was gross) (at which point Hayes chuckles as if we're supposed to find this dialogue funny?). later after Hayes is assaulted Glenn Ford's character's wife (Anne Francis) hindsight slut-shames her in a really needless scene. five years after Sidney Poitier played a tormented doctor in No Way Out, the only movie of its era to depict collective black defensive action against white racists in a heroic light, he's here playing a 'troubled student' who Glenn Ford (whose role would be played by Tom Hanks today maybe) sees potential in. there's an atrocious scene where he whitesplains to Poitier that the success of George Washington Carver and Joe Louis demonstrates that racism is no longer any excuse and then he starts bragging about how progressive the times are now and it's so easy now for black people to boostrap themselves in these modern times. it's so fucked. the end is a copout where the 'leader' of the delinquents is kind of scapegoated as the root cause of the other students' misbehavior (they were just knifing dudes but now that the bad influence is out of their lives they're cured!). there's a little bit of sociology lecturing, and a shoehorned scene that just fawns over the U.S. education system in areas that "aren't so troubled" (i mean if that sounds bad enough wait till you hear the content of this shit: it's temporarily disillusioned liberal do-gooder Glenn Ford returning to his mentor to refortify his dashed hopes, goddamn). Richard Brooks fucking sucked right? Stanley Kramer couldn't have fucked this up worse. the scene where the kids are destroying the poor mousy teacher's record collection is every boarder's worst nightmare.

Image

The Outlaw | Howard Hughes | Walter Huston / Jane Russell / Thomas Mitchell | 1943

it's just like the screencap just a lot of stiff posing in doorways. Hughes was clearly cinematically illiterate, i will hate him forever for running RKO into the ground but i at least thought this was supposed to be kinda good. but nope! there's a lot of fake-folksy cornball preening that's buttered over with an extra cornball-cutesy score. i mean it's just like four actors standing around each other. the guy who plays Billy the Kid was shit. Walter Huston is so good it's tragic how massive the waste of his performance is here. damn.

Image

Play It as It Lays | Universal | Frank Perry | Tuesday Weld / Anthony Perkins | 1972

i just read the book, which is easily my favorite Didion and just the most searing read. sometimes i wince at really spare terse prose but this is definitely perfection of that mode, the sun-devoured entanglement of pithy, freakish vignettes all gnarling to abrupt terminus. the lazily acid dialogue of characters in a perpetual stupor of amorality. perfect rhythmic sequencing of brief pungent details. it's a book you gotta associate with the most agonizing kind of sunlight, total erasure in an enveloping white heat, the golden allure of California melting into the blanched, razed despair of the final frontier of American sanity...anyway what huh oh shit i was supposed to be talking about the movie. the movie's okay. it gets some things right but then there are other things that should've been layups that were completely whiffed on. it's just kind of a redundant and incomplete experience when you've already read the novel's perfection.

Image

Arsene Lupin | MGM | Jack Conway | the Barrymore bros | 1932

this movie's nothing to write home about. but it's also kinda effortlessly wonderful in the way only Old Hollywood could be. i watched it at the top of the morning, with a little bit of sun glare on my TV, and i got so thrilled by the constant somersaults and reversals in the story and the mechanics of the performances, and all the magical artifice. an utter delight!

Image

The Mad Miss Manton | RKO | Leigh Jason | Barbara Stanwyck / Henry Fonda | 1938

the conceit is amusing for ten minutes but then it wears out its welcome. the dialogue is mostly a barrage of limp wit with some occasional zingers in the mix, but the plot is a weightless trifle that floats out of sight in the first twenty minutes and never quite returns into focus. Stanwyck knows she's playing a more caricatured or stylized character -- the socialite prankster (i guess technically you would call this screwball though when you think of the really good screwball out there...this just doesn't stack up) all becalmed frivolity in getting knocked about by the jams and twists in the plot. or to put it another way, she's the only character who treats it all as a roller coaster ride kinda, isn't taking all the murder lunacy so seriously. Henry Fonda is a straight man of sorts, not too effective. i feel like this is just a dribble of crayon the same Stanwyck/Fonda screwball dynamic that The Lady Eve refines into lean surefooted perfection.

Image

Beware, My Lovely | RKO | Harry Horner | Robert Ryan / Ida Lupino | 1952

i'm a big Robert Ryan fanatic and i'd never seen this cuz who tf is Harry Horner? well boy howdy did Eddie Czar of Noir Muller spend what seemed like a half hour meticulously elucidating every scrap of production history trivia he could get his grubby mitts on, so now i'm a goddamn Harry Horner expert. he was mainly a production designer and so he directs in a y'know 'classical' theatrical way, facilitating an amazing barrage of long-take arty compositions of Ryan's and Lupino's faces interplaying with the period knickknack-ridden decor. but it's a good little story too, genuinely chilling at parts, disquieting.

Image

The Suspect | Universal | Robert Siodmak | Charles Laughton!!!! | 1944

between Scarlet Street and Siodmak's Uncle Harry from the year after, there was definitely a mid-forties sub-cycle of movies about naive dopey older men set upon by shrewish wives or aunts or whoever it is...the protag played by Edward G Robinson or George Sanders or in this case the ever brilliant Charles Laughton, is driven to murder in pursuit of some tempting woman...it's all great noir fodder. this is good shit.

Image

Enchanted Island | RKO | Allan Dwan | Dana Andrews / some assholes | 1958

fuck this shit ass flick. garish racism/misogyny, all-around ineptitude. the diminishing returns of the Classical Hollywood western/adventure/action brand of auteurism. i guess Dwan was completely out of steam (even tho he did the stellar Silver Lode and Tennessee's Partner just a few years before), like i wonder what his sixties work looks like, jesus. Dana Andrews looks older in this than he does in the mid-60s flicks i've seen him in. he's an actor born for psychodramatic close-up, slick black-n-white, not photographed in this inept washed-out glaring n blaring Technicolor. the camera just seems to emphasize how pudgy and unremarkable Dana Andrews is, his jowls seem bigger than they probably are somehow.
Last edited by mystery meat on Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mystery meat » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:29 pm

landspeedrecord wrote:
mystery meat wrote:also sorry i'm late in keeping this thread up to speed i just broke up with my podcast partner of five years after he emotionally exploded and burned all his bridges in an inferno of self-destruction so i've been reeling n shit.

perhaps consider rebranding to the act of seething?

jokes aside, good podcast, sorry to see it go. rip it up and start again!

thank you landspeedrecord
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Postby Franco » Tue Jan 15, 2019 8:57 am

Image

Destry Rides Again (1939) jfc. Not anything that pushed the western genre forward, but it has the light-touch of Jimmy Stewart doing the Jimmy Stewart thing in the Old West, along with MARLENE DIETRICH singing, straight up running the town, and having a Grindhouse-level blowout brawl. Built not to fail.
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Postby mystery meat » Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:25 am

i can't believe i haven't seen that yet. the idea of Jimmy opposite Dietrich blows my mind
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Postby Plainsong » Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:42 am

Franco wrote:Image

Destry Rides Again (1939) jfc. Not anything that pushed the western genre forward, but it has the light-touch of Jimmy Stewart doing the Jimmy Stewart thing in the Old West, along with MARLENE DIETRICH singing, straight up running the town, and having a Grindhouse-level blowout brawl. Built not to fail.

Seconding this. Stewart and Dietrich together unexpectedly rules.
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Postby mellowgold » Wed Jan 30, 2019 5:51 pm

not sure if this is the thread to post this in but w/e!

in an attempt to curb myself from being caught in a frenzy when i have free time and having no idea what to watch, i developed a ridiculous system. to clear up some blindspots, too, i wrote out a bunch of filmmakers - some im familiar with but most im not -- and assigned them a number. then i randomly picked a number and work through some of that director's filmography.

I landed on Sydney Lumet first and watched Network (wow im dead), Dog Day Afternoon (really great!) and rewatched 12 Angry Men (there's nothing I can say). Landed on Hitchcock next which lol im prob familiar with him more than any other director ever but theres still plenty ive not seen. watched The Man Who Knew Too Much (56) (ive seen this maybe like 20 years ago. it's p good! better than the 30s version for sure. Doris Day singing "Que Sera Sera" in the final scene cracks me the eff up every time omg) and watched Marnie today, which is mostly bad but still found some stuff to like about it. Sean Connery is pretty awful in it.

anyway, ill update whenever i watch Mystery Meat Movieverse pictures!!! Going to do Notorious next and then move on to another filmmaker.
wimbledon, strawberries, bubbles, please protect me. happy midsumma, hope you spend it in your heart, everyone is there. bitch.
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Postby mystery meat » Wed Jan 30, 2019 5:54 pm

thank you for your contribution mellowgold! Lumet is such an exciting filmmaker to explore cuz he made soooo many movies. i'm gonna watch Lumet's The Hill soon, a Connery flick from the year after he did Marnie!

ima update my viewings later i'm so lazy
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