Best Comics 2023

Let's talk Aguachile Alley

Postby HotFingersClub » Sun Dec 17, 2023 5:26 am

The comics thread feels kind of quiet these days but comics are still here and good pictures are still being drawn. Here’s my favourite new publications from the last year.

I would characterise it as a solid but underwhelming year. Very few significant five star smashes but an improvement in the numbers of perfectly acceptable three star genre comics. I had another 10 or so comics that could have made the honourable mentions
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am


Postby HotFingersClub » Sun Dec 17, 2023 6:17 am

Image
Image
Philip Kennedy Johnson & Nic Klein - The Incredible Hulk
The Hulk’s new team plays many of the same cards as Ewing and Bennett did on The Immortal Hulk, and while I doubt they’re ever going to reach that series’ level of ambition and scope, these are very solid and incredibly handsome horror comics. Banner is a wandering vagrant again here, with the Hulk following him as a contemptuous and malevolent presence, not to mention a shadow kingdom of other monsters who are also trying to eat him for unimportant reasons. It’s worth showing up for the beautifully moody cartooning from Nic Klein and guest Travel Foreman.


Image
Image
Greg Rucka, Eric Trautmann & Mike Henderson - The Forged
Rucka and Trautmann’s space opera has been a nice reminder of the old school storytelling chops they bring to their projects. The series follows a team of female soldiers cloned from an immortal Empress. In the first arc their spaceship goes down, stranding them on a hostile alien planet, and in the second they’re taken back home for some imperial court intrigue. Rucka and Trautmann seem to be switching up the setting pretty drastically with every new storyline, but it has a strong base of good characters, good action and a little bit of horniness. Also really appreciate that each issue is 50 pages – this feels like a book you can make real progress in.


Image
Image
Wyatt Kennedy & Luigi Formisano - Nights
In an intriguingly reimagined version of Florida in 2003, a teenage boy moves into a houseshare with his cousin, a ghost and a hot scene vampire, all of whom are carrying secrets. Feels like we get a hundred of these supernatural vaguely YA-inflected comics every year but this one stood out by a mile with the craft of its writing and worldbuilding. For a book by two relative newcomers this is a very impressive series: Kennedy has a great grasp of tone and knack for staggered information release, and he’s sketched out this weird supernatural ecosystem with painstaking attention to detail. I’m starting to get pretty excited about new issues of this.


Image
Image
Caroline Cash - PeePee PooPoo
Cash put out three issues of a one-woman anthology this year: #69, #420 and #58008 which gives you some idea of the stakes at play. Cash has a lovely neat visual style with a few signature tics, particularly her willingness to go big on the panels. Her quick strips cover the same kind of punk world as Jaime Hernandez’s Locas stories but are often autobiographical. Really funny, charming and readable.


Image
Image
Deniz Camp & Luca Maresca - Children of the Vault
Undoubtedly the most talented new writer to be making inroads at the big 2 right now, while we wait for him to be given a serious project we can enjoy him showboating on the sidelines of the X-Men’s current situation. Camp’s mini follows the Children of the Vault, an artificially evolved group of mutants who have emerged to remake the world in their image and make life difficult for Orchis and the X-Men, as represented here by Cable and Bishop in big gun screwball mode. This would probably be higher up the list if it wasn’t so straightforwardly ripping off Grant Morrison’s first arc on JLA, but also it’s so great to have a new writer with Morrison’s level of ambition. It’s easy to realise how the main series is just reheating Hickman’s leftovers when Camp is giving us this many ideas in one mini.
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby HotFingersClub » Sun Dec 17, 2023 12:10 pm

Image
Image
20. Lukas Verstraete - A Book to Make Friends With
The English language debut of a very talented Flemish cartoonist, this graphic novel is a maximalist gumbo of warring influences and impulses, starting as a crime thriller but quickly turning into a messy and compelling fantasy as characters swap heads, change forms and undergo confusing encounters with demons, in events that operate with a sometimes-shaky internal logic but are depicted wonderfully in bursts of colourful cartooning extravagance. Although certainly not without its flaws, it’s at least one of the best looking books of the year.

Image
Image
19. Emily Carroll - A Guest in the House
Deservedly one of the most popular graphic novelists in the world, and mother of a whole new wave of modern horror comics, Carroll in her new book is in her most traditional mode, bringing us a ghost story set in a house on the lake, centring around a girl and her father as seen through the eyes of the new wife. There’s maybe more afoot here than it would first appear, but for most of its runtime this is simply a classic ghost story making great use of all the usual ingredients. Carroll’s art really effectively sells the scary moments as usual, and I enjoyed the unexpected undertones of the relationship between the new wife and her deceased predecessor.

Image
Image
18. Garth Ennis & Jacen Burrows - The Ribbon Queen
A gnarly, tightly-plotted new supernatural thriller from Garth Ennis, in the vein of A Walk Through Hell. A female cop on a police force bubbling over with barely-suppressed misogyny finds herself haunted by an unseen presence that gruesomely unravels its victims while they’re still alive. Ennis has made tonal decisions in previous series that have made him unpopular in some circles but he’s also one of the best technical writers out there, and all of that skill is being brought to bear in this new line he has in fucked-up issue-led horror, and he brings a real fire to this examination of institutional misogyny. Jacen Burrows is also kind of a marmite artist for some people but this kind of stark brutality is what he’s ideally suited to.

Image
Image
17. Al Ewing & Martin Coccolo - The Immortal Thor
Ewing is so productive and consistent that he typically makes my list multiple times every year, and 2023 is no exception. I guess the plan is to do for Thor what he did for the Hulk in The Immortal Hulk, because Ewing is taking the character back to a more Kirbyish feel in terms of the language and the old-school suit, while reclaiming some of the visceral power that the idea must have had in the 60s. He also gets deep into an intriguing bit of the mythos – the mysterious cosmic pantheon that sits in shadow above the gods of Asgard. Coccolo on art is a fantastic find; generally clean and stylish but check out the first issue and the entrance of Toranos – those images have more raw power than anything I can think of this year.

Image
Image
16. Jonathan Hickman & Valerio Schiti - G.O.D.S.
Just two issues in so far, but it’s great to see the best writer in comics inventing a new sandbox for himself in the Marvel universe. Normally more of a science guy, Hickman is delving into Marvel’s mystical side here with a focus on the complex relationship between two groups of immortals representing chaos and order. Doctor Strange and other magical types have been popping up a bit already but mostly this is brand new IP with a slick design sense and art courtesy of Schiti. Really feels like this could go anywhere at this stage.
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby manvstrees » Sun Dec 17, 2023 12:43 pm

Oh thank god
Slartisfgh is never mentioned in The Bible, but it is here, during one of the early battles, that Matthew spontaneously became liquid.
Radiation trace: negligible
User avatar

manvstrees
 
Posts: 25991
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 3:24 pm
Location: brooklyn

Postby window » Sun Dec 17, 2023 1:12 pm

mm gonna have to really think about it this year
User avatar

window
 
Posts: 3983
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 7:23 am

Postby Drinky » Sun Dec 17, 2023 10:14 pm

post
User avatar

Drinky
 
Posts: 3686
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 11:59 am

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 6:10 am

Image
Image
15. Ryan Alves/Ron Beek III - The Punishment: Afterlife
Alves and Beek here follow up their 2021 Punisher bootleg Social Justice that attempted to reclaim the idea and the logo of the Punisher from racist cops. That mini was a bit of a blunt object but this sequel burns with an elemental force, primarily due to the huge advances that Alves and Beek have made with their art. Having slaughtered another bunch of cops, The Punisher sits down with one of them to recount his life before the skull. A fantastic unofficial coda to Garth Ennis’s legendary 2004 run on the character, and visually one of the best takes I’ve seen on this icon.

Image
Image
14. Evan Narcisse, Spencer Ackerman & Jesus Merino - Waller vs Wildstorm
An interesting collaboration between two journalists who are only just starting out in comics, telling an out-of-continuity story in which Jackson King and other old school pre-Warren Ellis Wildstorm characters get given the run-around by stone cold antihero bureaucrat Amanda Waller. It feels like Ackerman brought some of his background in covering security to this series, which is unusually high-minded for a DC comic, operating in a rarefied space of espionage and investigative journalism. Even Lois Lane gets to do cool shit here, and if you have even vague memories of the original Wildstorm there’s always going to be something fun about everyone taking “the Cybernary chassis” really seriously as a game-changing WMD. Like the best 70s political thrillers this is serious and deeply unserious in perfect balance. Also claims some of the best action scenes of the year. Don’t be put off by the terrible title and RIYL the great 20th Century Men from last year.

ImageImage
13. Kieron Gillen, Al Ewing, Simon Spurrier & various artists - Sins of Sinister
Anyone still following X-Men knows that after a strong start in House of X / Powers of X it quickly lost focus and never really recovered momentum, but the stars still align occasionally for some fun stories. Here, three of Marvel’s best writers club together for the best Marvel crossover in recent memory. Having corrupted Krakoa’s Quiet Council, Mister Sinister’s influence takes over earth and spreads to the stars, kicking off the huge scope of this crossover, with three adjacent miniseries (Nightcrawlers; Storm and the Brotherhood of Mutants; Immoral X-Men) checking in with this universe at intervals of 10, 100 and 1000 years. It’s dense, imaginative and unrestrained, pretty much the opposite of most crossovers. Yeah, it’s one of those massive dystopian stories like Age of Apocalypse where the big reset button is hit at the end, but up until that point it’s a breakneck scifi opera bubbling over with cool new ideas for the X-Men.

Image
Image
12. Neil Gaiman & Mark Buckingham - Miracleman: The Silver Age
Crazy to think that we live in a world so oversaturated with legasequels that Gaiman can come back to Miracleman and no one cares. I don't think I saw anyone talking about this in 2023 but 30 years after they took over from Alan Moore on Miracleman, Gaiman and Buckingham have reunited for a sequel story set after the ascension of Miracleman and following the forgotten sidekick Young Miracleman as he tries to uncover his past. Amazingly, Gaiman really hasn’t missed a step here: this is lyrical, intelligent storytelling of the old school, honouring the Miracleman idea while fleshing out the world in ways that I think any reader would find satisfying. Miracleman, both Moore and Gaiman's versions, was kind of formative for me and certainly for the comics industry as a whole, and this has been a lovely way to step back into that world. Legacy storytelling at its best.

Image
Image
11. Heather Loase - I Spent Too Long on This Lettering / Boring-Ass Autobio Trash
Two great new minis of autobiographical material from a hilarious punk fantasist. One’s in colour and one’s in b&w but otherwise they’re of a piece: jagged, hugely energetic blasts of inky noise mostly about sex and TV. The black and white pieces in I Spent Too Long on This Lettering are so dense and ferocious that they look like death metal band logos. Everyone and their mother pumps out autobio comix so it’s impressive to see someone who makes that mode feel fresh and exciting in 2023, and to do it so consistently shows that there’s a lot of craft going into this material.
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby The Priest » Mon Dec 18, 2023 7:29 am

Love all of this shit even though I don't buy any of it
Thank you for reading my posts ❤️
User avatar

The Priest
 
Posts: 38286
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:48 pm

Postby the sequel » Mon Dec 18, 2023 9:28 am

Great stuff as always. I help out on a comic of the month club at my local shop and this will be super useful to come back to - the only book on here that I’ve read is A Guest in this House, and it’s as good as her previous books.

Excited to check out that new thor book too. Looks great.
the sequel
 
Posts: 105
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2020 7:58 pm

Postby xxx-xxx-xxxx » Mon Dec 18, 2023 9:45 am

hell yeah I was just reading Polygon's list last night and was hoping we'd get this thread again.

My two favorite titles that had issues in 2023 this year were Newburn and Joker: The Man who stopped laughing
Award winning author of threads about Ziggy using Preparation H™ as toothpaste, and Jay Leno being burned alive in his car
User avatar

xxx-xxx-xxxx
 
Posts: 16579
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:39 pm
Location: Chicago

Postby Smiling Penner-Lite » Mon Dec 18, 2023 11:34 am

thanks as always!
User avatar

Smiling Penner-Lite
 
Posts: 10421
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:21 pm

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 12:16 pm

Image
Image
10. Taylor Chiu - Handyman
The highest artist on my list who’s new to me, which maybe means it wasn’t a great year for new talent. That doesn’t detract from Chiu though, whose debut mini is an experimental marvel in which a housewife’s life is changed by the appearance of a psychedelic handyman, expanding her and her family’s minds to breaking point. Every inch of this is playful and strange: Chiu messes with colour, texture and photocopied physical media like sugar paper, while their characters speak in gnomic, illegible emojis. It’s not always easy to tell what’s happening here but there are many images of great power and as a whole it’s thrilling to read. One of few comics this year where I saw something new happening in a formal sense.

Image
Image
9. Derek M. Ballard - Cartoonshow
I recommended Ballard on this list a couple of years ago as a guy making some very different comics about being a single father of three, trapped in generational poverty. His art has been a bit hard to follow since then, mostly because his complex layouts are very non-insta-friendly but he posts exclusively to insta. This book is his first proper collection and it eliminates all the issues with his art in one fell swoop. Instead, this is just wall-to-wall good shit, enlightening and efficient, polemical and fierce without being didactic; compelling real-life dispatches from a genuine working class voice. Compulsively readable, loads of fun and definitely the best autobio stuff I’ve seen this year.

Image
Image
8. Liam Cobb - What Awaits Them
Okay so technically it’s a collection of older pieces, but if you’re not familiar with Cobb’s work I’d say this is an essential introduction to one of the coolest artists of the last decade. His rangey, cinematic storytelling and his interest in the intersection of architecture and nature have both been hugely influential for a guy who’s never really released a proper GN. What Awaits Them, beautifully put together by Breakdown, collects almost all his minicomics thus far, with stories including an iced-out western, a magical realist mystery set on a demolished brutalist estate, and of course the adventures of the Michelin Man, who Cobb sends on a very silly and extravagantly good-looking espionage expedition through the world’s best restaurants.

Image
Image
7. Frederic Coché - L'Almageste
Another regular masterpiece from one of the world’s most special and distinctive artists. If you’ve read these threads before you’ll probably have seen his unmistakable ghostly artwork, which he creates through etching rather than drawing. Here, Coché uses a strange architecture for his pages, whereby each double spread is formed of two central obelisks of art flanked by supporting columns depicting events that seem to supplement the narrative. In a non-linear and puzzle-like story, hordes of the dead invade heaven while an astronomer on the earth below watches their progress and makes maps of the stars. Atmosphere doesn't begin to describe the haunting quality of his images.

Image
Image
6. Ebisu Yoshikazu - I Wish I Was Stupid
A Breakdown translation and reprint of a 1982 collection, and a follow-up to the unexpected success of the Pits of Hell reprint. Yoshikazu was an icon of alternative manga in the 70s and 80s via his strips in Garo, and his singular material holds up incredibly well today. He specialises in a bizarre form of social satire in which nobody behaves like a human being and everyone is subject to insane irrational violence for no obvious reason. Flying saucers and burning buildings populate the background of his drawings. He’s also one of the funniest comics creators in any language. If you liked the deadpan absurdity of City Crime Comics last year this one will give you similar feelings. Some of the stories in here surpass anything in The Pits of Hell.
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby Gaylthea » Mon Dec 18, 2023 12:17 pm

The Priest wrote:Love all of this shit even though I don't buy any of it
User avatar

Gaylthea
 
Posts: 12859
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2014 12:04 am
Location: Another weirdo broad

Postby thickening agent » Mon Dec 18, 2023 1:27 pm

My copy of Sunday 5,6,7,X finally arrived this week, Olivier Schrauwen is always A+... very funny, often annoying yet always compelling, breaks down time and music and interior monologues in a way that is pretty interesting. Great ending

Caroline Cash's new books are great, cf's patreon zines are always fun. I need to get that Liam Cobb book and some of the new Alex Graham books, and check out Clowes' new book from the library at some point
User avatar

thickening agent
 
Posts: 1566
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2023 1:35 pm

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 1:49 pm

Speaking of...

Image
Image
5. Daniel Clowes - Monica
A welcome and rewarding return for probably the biggest living dog in the American alt-comix scene, Monica is the kaleidoscopic study of a woman’s life told through a series of weird genre pieces. Clowes follows Monica and the people associated with her through a complex web of often paranormal mysteries, culminating in one of the tensest stories of the year as Monica follows her mother into a deteriorating and eccentric cult in the desert. Masterful stuff from Clowes: feels totally personal and unique to his interests but also satisfying to readers anywhere on the genre/literary spectrum. And in barely 100 pages he can plunge you into a pool of connections and mysteries that seems to have no bottom. That’s why he’s the king.

Image
Image
4. Evin Collis - Litterpig III
Cheating a bit on my own rules to add the third mini in this ongoing series. Collis’s Litterpig is a soulful boar living in a complex landscape where nature struggles against human indifference and a rising tide of trash everywhere. But this is less an ecological parable than an immersive boar sim. The pig is rampant. Even the pain, fear and physical indignity of the animal condition is drawn with such vivaciousness, like the scenes of the pig struggling over barbed wire and forcing its snout through an electric fence to get at a beehive. Best issue yet in a consistently delightful series - Collis can eke such poignancy and thrills from watching a pig wander around.

Image
Image
3. Molly Stocks - Convoy
This is the first proper comic by an incredibly talented young British artist who has previously only produced tiny zines. Taking visual inspiration partly from Raymond Briggs and Studio Ghibli but mostly from the world around her, Stocks looks closely at a little boy in a windswept field, rain and fallen leaves whipping past his head as he lines up snails into a convoy. Childhood and wet Sundays in the countryside have rarely been captured so perfectly – a vibey mini-masterpiece.

Image
Image
Image
Image
2. Joe Kessler - Donkey
I put Kessler’s The Gull Yettin at the top of my list last year, and while his single release this year isn’t quite in the league of that book or Windowpane, it’s still better than almost anything else that came out in 2023. This gorgeous, huge-format 60 pager is a wordless parable of the refugee experience, following a tribe who are forced to flee into the jungle when their city is destroyed by a gigantic white lion – scenes that were among the most ravishing of the year. Kessler's loose, seemingly improvisatory style regularly throws up images and scenes of awesome power. It never ceases to amaze me how he can create such profound and richly emotive reading experiences with such simple tools.

Image
Image
Image
1. Rob Churm - The Stone Tape
Sometimes in the comics thread we go to some pretty strange places in pursuit of the realest shit but you have to trust us, it’s all comics. Sequentiality can be imparted via narrative but also inferred through apparently discrete works, pulling you along on a feeling or a vibe or some kind of psychic thread. When he’s not being the world’s most exciting draughtsman, Rob Churm is a big part of the Scottish underground music scene and chief booker at Glasgow venue The Old Hairdresser’s. The Stone Tape is a collection of some of the hundreds of bespoke posters he’s designed for bands playing at his venue and around Glasgow – a different poster for every gig. As with his ongoing series The Floating Bridge, these images completely break down not only the language of comics, but also fantasy illustration, photo collage and a hundred other styles. Even the individual lines never go where you expect, and yet every poster is instantly recognisable as his hand. The range and strength of his artistic identity – and the sheer skill with which he pulls off these technical contortions – is something to behold. This is not the place to come if you're looking to get into comics, but I can't honestly say I enjoyed another book more this year.
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby Dinosauria We » Mon Dec 18, 2023 1:57 pm

Oh hell yeah. One of my favorite annual threads.
User avatar

Dinosauria We
 
Posts: 6752
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 3:02 pm

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 2:01 pm

The full list:

Honourable mentions (5 random out of about 20 potential)
Philip Kennedy Johnson & Nic Klein - The Incredible Hulk
Greg Rucka, Eric Trautmann & Mike Henderson - The Forged
Wyatt Kennedy & Luigi Formisano - Nights
Caroline Cash - PeePee PooPoo
Deniz Camp & Luca Maresca - Children of the Vault

20. Lukas Verstraete - A Book to Make Friends With
19. Emily Carroll - A Guest in the House
18. Garth Ennis & Jacen Burrows - The Ribbon Queen
17. Al Ewing & Martin Coccolo - The Immortal Thor
16. Jonathan Hickman & Valerio Schiti - G.O.D.S.
15. Ryan Alves/Ron Beek III - The Punishment: Afterlife
14. Evan Narcisse, Spencer Ackerman & Jesus Merino - Waller vs. Wildstorm
13. Kieron Gillen, Al Ewing, Simon Spurrier & various artists - Sins of Sinister
12. Neil Gaiman & Mark Buckingham - Miracleman: The Silver Age
11. Heather Loase - I Spent Too Long on This Lettering / Boring-Ass Autobio Trash
10. Taylor Chiu - Handyman
9. Derek M. Ballard - Cartoonshow
8. Liam Cobb - What Awaits Them
7. Frederic Coché - L'Almageste
6. Ebisu Yoshikazu - I Wish I Was Stupid
5. Daniel Clowes - Monica
4. Evin Collis - Litterpig III
3. Molly Stocks - Convoy
2. Joe Kessler - Donkey
1. Rob Churm - The Stone Tape

Thanks for reading everyone, I love doing this and would ideally do it approx once every two months if comics came out faster
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby window » Mon Dec 18, 2023 3:17 pm

4 out of my top 5 are translations and/or collections of previously released material. whoops.

Image

5. Okinawa - Susuma Higa

Beautiful and enlightening looking into the last days of WWII - several years post-war through the lens of Japanese civilians

Image

4. What Awaits Them - Liam Cobb

A great collection that only makes the slow-down of Cobb's comic output more frustrating

Image

3. Yokohama Kaidashi Kiko deluxe edition 3 - Hitoshi Ashinano

Didn't expect a cute little slice-of-life manga series to become so moving

Image

2. Blue Swimmer, Flowers of the Convict, A Distant Table, Norden Bombsite, etc - CF

CF's minis this year have been really compelling

Image

1. Stories from Zoo - Anand

Really funny and strange, bullseye to the sweet spot for me of how comics can be surreal and yet totally "understandable" in their own universe
User avatar

window
 
Posts: 3983
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 7:23 am

Postby window » Mon Dec 18, 2023 3:22 pm

a better distribution system for alt-ish comics has got to emerge, it's ridiculous how impossible it is to get 1/2 of the titles on HFC's list in the US
User avatar

window
 
Posts: 3983
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 7:23 am

Postby mutism » Mon Dec 18, 2023 3:27 pm

dumb question from a non-comic person but who would love to get into these over the holidays, where do i buy/dl these
User avatar

mutism
 
Posts: 2466
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:46 pm

Postby thickening agent » Mon Dec 18, 2023 4:20 pm

For the non-superhero stuff, there's sites like

https://www.wigshopwebshop.com/books
http://dominobooks.org/store.html (I don't know why their site has been messed up for a while, maybe it still works?)
https://store.silversprocket.net/

For the US anyway... If you live in NYC/Chicago/SF/LA/etc there's maybe one or two or hell even three stores that sell stuff like this. Also there are alt comics conventions / zine fests / art book fairs / small press fairs where artists and stores and distributors bring their stuff to sell, big ones like TCAF in Toronto, Short Run in Seattle, CAKE in Chicago, whatever they do in New York, and even a lot of cities the size of Milwaukee or Columbus or Ann Arbor or whatever have great shows like this now
User avatar

thickening agent
 
Posts: 1566
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2023 1:35 pm

Postby window » Mon Dec 18, 2023 5:47 pm

i use https://50wattsbooks.com/ sometimes

it's crazy to me that there's not a (gulp) "boomkat for comics"
User avatar

window
 
Posts: 3983
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 7:23 am

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 7:40 pm

And you can find the more genre type stuff and some Fantagraphics material on getcomics and a bunch of other websites. Download yourself a reader like Honeyview
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 7:43 pm

Anand’s Zoo made my list last year I think. One of the absolute best new artists out there. In 2023 he would probably be my number one. If you’re looking to treat yourself to something cool this Christmas you should ignore my list and get that book
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Dec 18, 2023 7:46 pm

Yokohama Kodaishi Kikou is top 5 all time manga for me so yeah im a big fan of the window list
User avatar

HotFingersClub
 
Posts: 3570
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2014 3:31 am

Postby Hal Jordan » Mon Dec 18, 2023 8:24 pm

Dinosauria We wrote:Oh hell yeah. One of my favorite annual threads.
A lamp with a white shade was knocked over and broken. Someone was smoking pot. “This is the pot room!” a young man said.
Hal Jordan
 
Posts: 28792
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 2:57 pm

Postby sevenarts » Tue Dec 19, 2023 7:59 am

Great stuff as always. I’ve barely read anything new this year, sadly, but I tremendously enjoyed the Emily Carroll, Frederic Coche, and Olivier Schrauwen books.

Excited to go digging through these lists for more once I get the motivation to read some more again.
User avatar

sevenarts
 
Posts: 7202
Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2010 4:05 pm
Location: NY

Postby Smiling Penner-Lite » Tue Dec 19, 2023 11:49 am

Launching Juggernaut at relativistic speeds to be used as a bullet through Thanos' brain and then just ghosting Juggernaut in the depths of space is 10/10
User avatar

Smiling Penner-Lite
 
Posts: 10421
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:21 pm

Postby walt whitman » Tue Dec 19, 2023 11:57 am

Hal Jordan wrote:
Dinosauria We wrote:Oh hell yeah. One of my favorite annual threads.

seriously
“Short film, Long film, It’s ALL film!” - Walt Whitman
User avatar

walt whitman
 
Posts: 9676
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2011 3:26 pm
Location: a castle of narcissicism and insecurities

Next

Return to Aguachile Alley

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: angel scribe, barbara_h, beefbroth inthe shitpipes, bluelips, buriedinspace, chewy, dan, darger, Eyeball Kid, florida man, Flossed Out, FourLegsGood, goldmatt, Google [Bot], Grumby, hbb, hells bells, Hot Carl, iambic, jacopo, Jouster, Kevin McCallister, kudzers, lights, mcwop23, Melville, Merciel, mondrary, mynameisdan, No Good Advice, palmer eldritch, papi chulo, Philip Graff , Post Modern, rankoutsider, Recent Digest, ripersnifle, ruiner, Sad Panda, salò moon, scurrydog, shizaam, Shotfrog, sneakyflutes, springheeljack, sunrise, surly, techno beats, terminus, trampoline, tricksforchips, truncated, virtuous, wakeman, worrywort, wuk, your army and 164 guests