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Postby Spooky Jim » Tue Dec 11, 2018 1:31 pm

Is this thread just for movies or can I talk about H.P. Lovecraft in here?
Combarieu declares that the songs of birds are not "musical" either, because they are "very difficult to take down in notation." See his Music-Its Laws and Evolution, 155. Will some divine power please create a "Musical" bird to sing the Air for G String in exact Equal Temperament for M. Combarieu?
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Postby aububs » Tue Dec 11, 2018 2:22 pm

thread is for HORROR so yeah please do
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Postby Poptone » Tue Dec 11, 2018 2:22 pm

You can...IF YOU DARE
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Postby Spooky Jim » Tue Dec 11, 2018 9:38 pm

So I recently started reading Lovecraft. I had many friends talk to me about it before, so I had an idea about it through them to some degree, and then there is just all the shit I had seen just from being into RPGs as a kid and reading old Eerie, Heavy Metal and Epic magazines, as well as just other stuff where his stuff floats around or gets referenced.

Anyway, so from having read maybe the first 6 or so stories in his "complete fiction" omnibus, what I find interesting is the thing that is so tantalizing, moving and exciting about his stories is that some little nerd is gonna (deservingly) get straight smoked by some demon, or at best, go completely mad, or become so terrified his brain melts, by the end of the story. Of course, there is this explicit xenophobia and racisms throughout Lovecraft's work, but you can also look at Cthulu and the old ones as hella buff socialist woke god. Like, from Lovecraft's perspective, the reason it is so terrifying that Cthulu and Ysaggoth and whatever else exist, is because they are worshipped with the express intention of bringing about the end of the current world order, and it also seemingly terrifies these WASPy dorks to discover that everyone else actually worships a god who is 100% real and efficacious and is significantly older and more responsive than their religion. But it only makes sense that like sailors and longshoremen and other working class people (who generally are also people of color in his stories) want the world order to end. Of course, Lovecraft describes it as the end of the world, and not world order, but come on, we know that's not the case; Cthulu already lived on earth and didn't end it. It is just the end of the world to the people from whose perspective we ever see in his writings.

The thing is, you can also tell that Lovecraft is getting off on this idea; and of course he is! I mean, he spent nearly his entire life birthing this world, and so it only makes sense that he likes it. But for all his derisive dismissal of pretty much anything other than Anglo-new england culture, values and racial composure as savage, brutish, and nearly sub-human, the idea of this possibly existing is, to him, the most exciting idea he can possibly fathom. And not only that, the only possible response he can envision for anyone to take when confronted with this, is to nearly revert to a catatonic state. There is not real response for these people when confronted with the fact that "the other" in fact does have a complex, ancient, articulated and potent society and culture (albiet macabre and base).
Combarieu declares that the songs of birds are not "musical" either, because they are "very difficult to take down in notation." See his Music-Its Laws and Evolution, 155. Will some divine power please create a "Musical" bird to sing the Air for G String in exact Equal Temperament for M. Combarieu?
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Postby loaf angel » Wed Dec 12, 2018 1:00 am

https://bloody-disgusting.com/tv/3537144/weekly-joe-bob-briggs-series-coming-shudder-early-2019/

this is guaranteed to keep me a paying member. hopefully other streaming services learn that people enjoy witty, informed curators. or idk I mean genre weirdos dig it
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Postby aububs » Wed Dec 12, 2018 5:28 am

thanks for that post spooky jim. I've only read one or two stories and keep meaning to delve further. I have two lovecraft collections for years but consistently get distracted. did you read alan moore's recent Providence comic? it's really good imo. it's a lovecraft inspired story that also features lovecraft himself and then is also about "lovecraft culture" in general. genuinely scary at times too. I think my new year's resolution will be to finally read more lovecrafts
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Postby Spooky Jim » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:26 am

I haven't read that, but it sounds cool. I have read little Alan Moore, but what I have read I liked a lot. One of those being Super Man: Whatever happened to the man of Tomorrow? and I hate Superman, but thought that comic was super cool. Also, I haven't read Swamp Thing in a long time, but now realizing that Alan Moore is a big Lovecraft fan puts his version more in perspective I think.

Reading his works also really gives framing for almost all modern sci-fi and horror. I was aware that he has influenced most filmmakers, comic artists and authors of the genres, but I wasn't aware of to what extent. So, I really do think you should read his work, Aububs, since you are a horror-buff. It actually makes me want to read older authors now and trace the full origins of the horror genre. I have read Dracula, but I never read Frankenstein or any Poe. Not really sure who else forms the bedrock of horror though. I guess 18th-century bestiaries and occult tomes that document supposedly true events (like Sabine Barring Gould's Book of Werewolves) are the precursors to the horror novel at that point.

Something about his work actually reminds me of R. Crumb (and Kafka perhaps) in that they all seem to be these sorta nervous, self-loathing, introverts who sublimate that self-loathing, as well as their guilty pleasures, into their work. All their work is based on some internal fragility, and knowing they don't actually measure up to some sort of ideal. In Lovecraft's case though, he seems to take that insecurity, and injects into the "other", as almost all his work is about this encounter with the other, framed through a ethno-racial lens, and prevailing ideas about race and culture amongst educated white new englanders at the time. But, setting aside the social context and personal feelings from which he wrote for a moment, the thing that is most enduring about Lovecraft's work, and I think really is at the heart of most horror, is the terror in uncovering this profound, universal truth. I know some other religious studies people are on this board, and it is like Rudolph Otto's description of numen tremendum; the awestruck and terrifying experience of coming face to face with the divine. Read most personal accounts of people claiming to encounter god or gods, and they are terrifying! They fear to look at the face of the divinities, with some intuitive knowledge that doing so would wholly obliterate them. And often in these accounts, they are painfully obiliterated, and then made a new from scratch. And as Divinity and social order are always interdependent, it follows that Lovecraft couches his numinous experience in the manner he does. Following his era though, a lot of horror and sci-fi began replacing the terrifying other with aliens and allegory for communism.

Anyway, I dunno if anyone cares about my ideas on HP lovecraft or not, but I guess I'm a little bored here, reading stuff but not talking to anyone about it.
Combarieu declares that the songs of birds are not "musical" either, because they are "very difficult to take down in notation." See his Music-Its Laws and Evolution, 155. Will some divine power please create a "Musical" bird to sing the Air for G String in exact Equal Temperament for M. Combarieu?
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Postby manvstrees » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:29 am

is dunwich best lovecraft or worst lovecraft
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Postby Spooky Jim » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:36 am

So of the stories I have read so far, which includes Dunwhich, I think it is weaker because it is the story which the monster is most explicitly described, and has the most widespread encounter with people and stuff so far. I think one of the strengths in Lovecraft's work is the hinting at the horrors and letting you as the reader just understand it is terrifying rather than describing it. The idea that some weird inbred family worships the old ones and is trying to incarnate them on earth is scaryToggle Spoiler. To actually have them so concretely described, and that some professors can banish them out of the realm and kill themToggle Spoiler cheapens it, and makes them seem sorta weak. It's like why True Detective Season 1 is horrible at the end. I'd rather not have seen the family and carcosa, but they could have hinted at it.
Combarieu declares that the songs of birds are not "musical" either, because they are "very difficult to take down in notation." See his Music-Its Laws and Evolution, 155. Will some divine power please create a "Musical" bird to sing the Air for G String in exact Equal Temperament for M. Combarieu?
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Postby aububs » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:38 am

Spooky Jim wrote:Also, I haven't read Swamp Thing in a long time, but now realizing that Alan Moore is a big Lovecraft fan puts his version more in perspective I think.


that's a really good call and something I hadn't thought of

love swampy sooo much
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Postby manvstrees » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:44 am

answer is best despite how it breaks most of his rules
distills everything from unseen local massacre, distant cosmic deep time horror, pure satanism, superhero sorcerer librarians
watching the shit go down through the scope on the hilltop is such a perfect horror climax
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Postby manvstrees » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:47 am

Spooky Jim wrote:So of the stories I have read so far, which includes Dunwhich, I think it is weaker because it is the story which the monster is most explicitly described, and has the most widespread encounter with people and stuff so far. I think one of the strengths in Lovecraft's work is the hinting at the horrors and letting you as the reader just understand it is terrifying rather than describing it. The idea that some weird inbred family worships the old ones and is trying to incarnate them on earth is scaryToggle Spoiler. To actually have them so concretely described, and that some professors can banish them out of the realm and kill themToggle Spoiler cheapens it, and makes them seem sorta weak. It's like why True Detective Season 1 is horrible at the end. I'd rather not have seen the family and carcosa, but they could have hinted at it.


thats interesting cause in td you still never see a thing, you just see cole have another acid vision and a mundane killer that made an art installation that let him echo his voice a bunch, and then they don't catch the higher conspirators

same in dunwich to me that description isn't concrete at all, more like barker's iad uroborous once they manifest and roam through town, where they are writhing engines that are impossible to catch with the eye
the dunwich things are big shuggoth tentacle masses right? one of them manifests the family's faces for a minute but i never thought of this as a clear thing that can be visualized
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Postby manvstrees » Wed Dec 12, 2018 11:48 am

youd probably be interested in how moore tries to tackle lovecrafts racism and victoran mindset, but moore's bawdy progressive versions feel similarly stale to me
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Postby Spooky Jim » Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:23 pm

Oh, do I need to go back and watch TD season 1's last episode? Maybe I misinterpreted the ending. I'll check out that Moore comic.

I took the description of the monsters in Dunwich to be pretty explicit. After they find Wilbur's body in the library it seems pretty explicit. He is like a mass of tentacles and snakes or something. His brother is a bit more vaguely described, as it is from the perspective of the people at a distance and him flashing into view for only a moment.Toggle Spoiler I definitely enjoyed the story, but I think that like, The Namesless City, or The Festival or even Whisperer in the Dark have a scarier tone over all.Such as, in Whisperer in the Dark, the vagueness of what was really going on while the protagonist lies in the bed a Ackley's house, hearing the conspirers talking downstairs. That to me felt like a truly terrifying moment rather than a sorta grandious adventure. It is very intimate and present.Toggle Spoiler

Oh, I remember another old horror thing that I read and rules: Melmoth the Wanderer. Anyone else read that?
Combarieu declares that the songs of birds are not "musical" either, because they are "very difficult to take down in notation." See his Music-Its Laws and Evolution, 155. Will some divine power please create a "Musical" bird to sing the Air for G String in exact Equal Temperament for M. Combarieu?
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Postby smelts » Wed Dec 12, 2018 4:06 pm

looking for a couple movies this to complete my Christmas horror watch list

Feeders
Feeders 2: Slay Bells
Jack Frost 2: Revenge Of The Mutant Killer Snowman

if anybody has any of these they could throw in the dropbox i would be eternally grateful!
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Postby futurist » Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:52 pm

i have both Feeders but haven't been able to log into the dropbox in weeks for some reason
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Postby loaf angel » Fri Dec 21, 2018 9:23 pm

Image

love that Joe Bob is becoming the ambassador of Shudder
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Postby loaf angel » Fri Dec 21, 2018 9:23 pm

(he's hosting Phantasm 1-4 btw)
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Postby Robo-Chachi » Thu Dec 27, 2018 9:32 pm

Anyone else been having a bunch of issues with the Letterboxed app lately? Seems like search doesn’t work 70% of the time anymore.
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Postby Mesh » Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:03 pm

Robo-Chachi wrote:Anyone else been having a bunch of issues with the Letterboxed app lately? Seems like search doesn’t work 70% of the time anymore.


Yeah, app and site both Gremlins a lot.
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Postby a is jump » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:04 pm

Super late to the Mike Flanagan train, but just watched Absentia and thought it was really effective. I dug the uneasy atmosphere throughout, fueled by the amount of handheld camera and the droney score. I can be a sucker for movies that play on whether the horror is purely psychological or if it's actually "happening," and Absentia rode that line really well as it was building the story. Honestly, to tie in to the current topic, it was a little Lovecraftian in a lot of ways in how it kept most of the horror just out of reach and focused on the emotional fallout from largely unseen forces. Refreshing to see a low budget horror movie that doesn't depend on comedy, gore, T&A, or nostalgia.

Between Netflix and Prime, it looks like most of his stuff is pretty available to stream. Just no Oculus or Ouija. I'm assuming those are worth tracking down?
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Postby ahungbunny » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:40 pm

speaking of lovecraft, bird box is a mythos movie in every way but explicitly (and one particular thing that happens). i'm a sucker for anything along those lines and i'm stoked that it's getting a lot of attention

i never really thought lovecraft was a very compelling writer (i more love the ideas behind the writing) but spooky jim's convinced me to give him another chance. i'd also highly recommend the later robert e howard conan stories, which i can't seem to talk about enough around here. by this point he was on a similar weird wavelength to his bud howard p, just in a different (and more engaging, i'd argue) setting. this collection in particular is straight up fantasy horror

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Postby hiddenicon » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:50 pm

Mesh wrote:
Robo-Chachi wrote:Anyone else been having a bunch of issues with the Letterboxed app lately? Seems like search doesn’t work 70% of the time anymore.


Yeah, app and site both Gremlins a lot.


yeah, they got some new servers which would speed things up, but then they hit a snag with implementing em.... theyre working on a fix to the bottleneck and say it might take a few weeks.
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Postby Riverchrist » Mon Dec 31, 2018 5:33 pm

A later Lovecraft style story I just found is Notorious T.E.D. Klein's "The Events at Poroth Farm." It's 75% "The Colour Out of Space" and 25% "The Thing." He wrote it when he was about 24.

The narrator studies gothic horror (Melmoth etc.) and those books all tie into the story.
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Postby i am rich » Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:09 pm

a is jump wrote:Super late to the Mike Flanagan train, but just watched Absentia and thought it was really effective. I dug the uneasy atmosphere throughout, fueled by the amount of handheld camera and the droney score. I can be a sucker for movies that play on whether the horror is purely psychological or if it's actually "happening," and Absentia rode that line really well as it was building the story. Honestly, to tie in to the current topic, it was a little Lovecraftian in a lot of ways in how it kept most of the horror just out of reach and focused on the emotional fallout from largely unseen forces. Refreshing to see a low budget horror movie that doesn't depend on comedy, gore, T&A, or nostalgia.

Between Netflix and Prime, it looks like most of his stuff is pretty available to stream. Just no Oculus or Ouija. I'm assuming those are worth tracking down?

yeah theyre all good
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Postby Ampersand » Mon Dec 31, 2018 7:04 pm

Riverchrist wrote:A later Lovecraft style story I just found is Notorious T.E.D. Klein's "The Events at Poroth Farm." It's 75% "The Colour Out of Space" and 25% "The Thing." He wrote it when he was about 24.

The narrator studies gothic horror (Melmoth etc.) and those books all tie into the story.


His other major stories can be found in the killer Dark Gods story collection. Essential horror reading!
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Postby Riverchrist » Mon Dec 31, 2018 7:40 pm

Thanks, I'll pick it up when I find it. I'm working through Peter Straub's 'American Fantastic Tales' and there's a lot that's new to me.

Thomas Tessier is another I'd never heard of, already ordered a book of his.
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Postby Riverchrist » Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:52 pm

Image

An American fuccboi in London meets a cosmetic surgeon and his murderously horny assisstant. Tessier slow plays everything, and only after 150 pages do you get Cronenberg style body horror. That doesn't really go anywhere except for speeches about power and fantasy etc. Hey, it was the '80s. This hasn't aged well but it's a sleazy novel written skillfully and that isn't easy. In a book of blood and banging, Tessier still knows when to write "barfed" instead of "vomited" because it is funnier.

There's nothing supernatural here, and no twist at the end though I thought I was noticing clear hints toward something more. It's almost a lot of things. Dorian Gray comes to mind, Faust... it could all be a low-key rumination on alcoholism. I can't quite recommend it but I'll look for more of his books.
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Postby Spooky Jim » Thu Jan 10, 2019 4:09 pm

ahungbunny wrote:speaking of lovecraft, bird box is a mythos movie in every way but explicitly (and one particular thing that happens). i'm a sucker for anything along those lines and i'm stoked that it's getting a lot of attention

i never really thought lovecraft was a very compelling writer (i more love the ideas behind the writing) but spooky jim's convinced me to give him another chance. i'd also highly recommend the later robert e howard conan stories, which i can't seem to talk about enough around here. by this point he was on a similar weird wavelength to his bud howard p, just in a different (and more engaging, i'd argue) setting. this collection in particular is straight up fantasy horror

Image

sucks they were both horrible racists


Weird you just brought up Bird Box. My in-laws put it on the other night, but I missed it cause I had to put the baby to sleep. It looked really cool from what I saw.

The Conan mythos has always been really intriguing to me. This is a good tip - is it worthwhile to read them through in order? What other threads you discussing this in?
Combarieu declares that the songs of birds are not "musical" either, because they are "very difficult to take down in notation." See his Music-Its Laws and Evolution, 155. Will some divine power please create a "Musical" bird to sing the Air for G String in exact Equal Temperament for M. Combarieu?
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Postby honkduh » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:29 pm

Splatter with Corey Feldman is on Netflix :D

After self righteous rockstar Jonny Splatter puts a bullet in his own head, only five people are chosen to attend the reading of Splatter's will. The manager, the shrink, the guitarist, the lover, and the groupie. Will they get what they came for or what Splatter thinks they deserve?

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