Alternative/independent comics thread

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby sevenarts » Thu Jun 28, 2018 8:20 pm

Also, really psyched that you loved Sex Fantasy, too. It's an amazing book and I can't wait to see what she does next. I also highly recommend both issues of Lovers Only from Youth In Decline for more of her in the meantime - the first one has the story that introduced me to her and it's very much of a piece with the material in Sex Fantasy, except in color.

I love Gary Panter personally, he's in my canon for sure and Jimbo In Purgatory in particular is among my favorite comics. Which is not to say it's not impenetrable at times, or tough to get into. What I love about his art is the tension it has between different levels and different aesthetics. His trashy punk sensibility and ragged, scratchy lines suggest punky abandon and yet his comics are elaborately structured and formally very rigid. By the same token, he grabs very formal, classically literary texts and then places them into a context with pop culture detritus, post-apocalyptic imagery, wild abstractions, and goofy cartoony stereotypes. His comics read very differently to me than almost anything else. They're not really narrative works, even though they often recycle narrative structures from the texts they're pillaging. They're more meant to be pored over, explored, taking in the densely detailed pages, the way everything fits together into these amazingly designed full-page patterns and schemes. I can't think of any other artist in comics who so thoroughly deconstructs, interrogates, and outright pokes fun at the relationship between images, text, and design in comics. They're bracingly formalist comics and yet there's a real looseness and vibrancy in so many of the details that keeps it from being just dry academic exercises to me. Also, I'm not sure how you're reading it but Purgatory, like most Panter comics, is a BIG book, in terms of the page dimensions - I can't imagine how much it must lose on a tablet.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Fri Jun 29, 2018 5:25 am

That's a brilliant defence, and you're right, I read it (or tried to read it) on my little notebook screen, and thought the density and crabbedness of it were a stylistic choice closer to what Jablonski does in Cryptic Wit. Maybe I can find a library that stocks the print version.
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Postby Wombatz » Fri Jun 29, 2018 6:50 am

yes, sevenarts, thanks for that! i will admit that with comics i'm just not willing to put the work in, i want my instant gratification.
sevenarts wrote:They're not really narrative works, even though they often recycle narrative structures ...

that's probably even true for the other stuff! anyway, i have an older raw collection (jimbo: adventures in paradise) and the art is absolutely amazing, it's just that after a few pages i don't know what all the words are for, no proper jokes, no real narrative (except for the standard level of picaresque that automatically comes with moving from panel to panel), happily also no forced surrealisms where the protagonist goes "where am wtf's this", no heavy-handed allegories ... some pages are just great, but accumulatively the words wear me down, even when there are much fewer than in purgatory ...

purgatory i didn't really try, mostly because the source material already does mean something to me ... not to say that i read a lot of dante, but there are so many centuries of amazing pictures out of him, like, here's just a random first google hit ...

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anything from mathematical renaissance diagrams of the circles of hell to doré's nightmares ... that i must admit for once i find panter visually boring. so it does come down to the words, and they're many.

i also have the picturebox twofer, which has lots of great notebook pages but is a bit too posh for its own good. panter so much should be my cup of tea. maybe i'm just resisting that :-)
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Postby Wombatz » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:12 am

HotFingersClub wrote:I thought Jessica Farm was pretty good. Def not my favourite Simmons. Why did you like it? Have you read Hans Rickheit's books?

it is my favorite simmons, but not for intelligent reasons, i just love the tone and (probably because of the way it was supposedly made, one page per month) its openness where the art will change along with the narrative, and that in some (and often different) ways, each page delivers ... hm, i don't see any connection to rickheit (haven't liked what i tried by him at all, too much easy surrealism (see above) and exploitative buttcheeks :oops: ), except maybe for the basic badass girl wandering the woods thing ...
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Postby HotFingersClub » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:30 am

The butts are pretty lame in Rickheit. The first volume of Jessica Farm reminded me a lot of The Squirrel Machine - the grisly tone, the dreamlike shifting of place and the worldly/naive girl protagonist oscillating between childhood and mature sexuality. Particularly the long section where she's wandering through the house in company of those strange characters, each portal leading to another improbable space.

I really like the way Simmons handles interior space in general, especially in House (which is probably my favourite of his work). The way it keeps expanding and refusing to connect gives me a kind of videogame sense of exploring a haunted mansion - I'm always going to be drawn to the mysteries of sprawling houses. Rickheit's books, which are all the same, are almost a distillation of that feeling in that, unlike Simmons' work, they contain nothing else of interest, just the pleasure of trying to imagine how the rooms fit together.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Wed Jul 04, 2018 6:17 am

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Liam Cobb – Conditioner
I loved this so much. Well, I could probably have done without the third story with the talking fish, but the rest of it was gorgeous, especially the centrepiece story about the demolition of the Heygate Estate, which juxtaposes brutalism with magic in a way which just spoke to me. I’m pretty familiar with this area of London and was tangentially involved with the Heygate demolition, and Cobb’s story does an incredible job in both art and narrative of capturing the desolation and the captivating tension of concrete and plantlife that fills spaces like the Barbican. At the same time, there’s something about it which feels like an early work – a sense that it’s underdeveloped or hasn’t found its own voice. I don’t mind though. I’m excited to start following Cobb’s output.

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Ian Edginton & D’israeli – Kingdom of the Wicked
This felt leaden after the ethereality of Conditioner. I have a soft spot for Edginton because I randomly read his Authority rip-off/spin-off The Establishment when I was getting into comics and really loved how much of it went over my head. This book is one of those stories where the protagonist goes back to his childhood fantasy world to find it’s been TWIZTED by a malevolent force. D’israeli, who is generally brilliant and underrated, does an excellent job of selling the horror, evoking the futurism of Lorenzo Mattotti’s Fires, but Edginton’s contribution still feels pedestrian – probably more so now than it did in 1997.

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Kyle Starks – Kill Them All
It’s another action comedy from the guy who brought you Sexcastle and Rock Candy Mountain, both of which are more enjoyable and sprightly than this one, which lumbers under the weight of its influences. In this one, a hard drinking tough guy cop and a beautiful assassin fight their way to the top of a tower block to kill a ganglord. There are some decent jokes in here but it feels like it was rushed out between the two aforementioned books and there’s a lack of fresh ideas.

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Tom Parkinson-Morgan – Kill Six Billion Demons v2
Yes, yes, fucking sick. First volume was great and this feels like a massive step forward. I still can’t get over how much visual detail and fascinating character designs he can cram onto every page, but now that the whirlwind tour is out of the way I’m actually getting really invested in the lore and the plot (if not quite the characters, it must be said) in a way that doesn’t really happen to me much anymore. The whole sequence in Nadia Om’s palace feels like it finally brings the series into a more comprehensible frame, and it immediately kicks off with massive blockbuster action while never sacrificing the visual fireworks. I’d be amazed if Parkinson-Morgan can sustain this intensity but I am 100% on board for this cool shit smorgasboard.
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Postby sevenarts » Wed Jul 04, 2018 2:46 pm

Nice reviews. Glad you dug that Cobb book, I think he's great though what you said about it feeling like early work resonated too and made me realize I have the same impression without actually forming it enough to put into words. Everything he does is cool and interesting but it definitely feels like he has the potential to go further eventually. He's got a great formalist's sensibility for space and pacing. He has a new book out I ordered the other day, looks to be in his more direct narrative vein which is cool because Slow Drift was nice.
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Postby sevenarts » Wed Jul 04, 2018 3:18 pm

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Clover Honey by Rich Tommaso
I got into Tommaso with his Image books so sometimes I forget how long he's been around, this is a graphic novel from 1995, recently re-released. Speaking of early works, this is definitely one. It reads like Clowes lite doing noir, pretty rough around the edges and the verbosity at times gets really out of hand - the narration in the second chapter is abysmal. Still, it has its pleasures, mainly Tommaso's very crisp, clean cartooning, which isn't as stylized and quirky here as it's come to be but is still quite nice. I also dig how unlikable pretty much all the characters are, especially the 2 parallel protagonists.

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Henchgirl by Kristen Gudsnuk
Originally a webcomic I think, then collected in single issues and a collection. One of a seemingly infinite supply of cute, charming alt/indie genre books out these days, but it's very well crafted and its charm is earned rather than cheap. It's about a slacker young woman who stumbles into a life of crime through sheer laziness more than evil, haphazardly assisting a criminal gang for lack of better job prospects. Pretty fun, low-key funny, and Gudsnuk's cartooning adds a lot to the appeal - her characters strike this interesting balance between cutesy innocence, sexy bad girl cartooning, and schlubby slice-of-life normality. It's a good mix and a lot of the book's vitality comes from how much fun her figures are to just look at and watch interacting, whether it's in the goofy fight scenes or just chatting about scary movies or food. It has moments of surprising deeper emotion but a lot of it drifts by amiably but a little too easily, and the story goes to some truly baffling places towards the end in ways that pretty much lost me. Still, good fun for most of its length.

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The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang
Real good new GN about a prince whose love of women's clothes causes him to lead a secretive second life with the help of an ambitious young dressmaker. The story's pointed message about inclusivity and acceptance is well done and a welcome presence in this likely YA-targeted book, but thankfully Wang achieves her polemical message through excellent character work and a lovingly crafted modern fairy tale so that it rarely gets too heavyhanded. Maybe doesn't fit too well with a lot of what we talk about in this thread but it's quite good and anyone who enjoys some of the smarter YA-focused comics coming out these days will do well checking this out for a fun read.

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Stuck Rubber Baby by Howard Cruse
Here's a classic graphic novel I never got around to for some reason, and it's a shame because it's definitely one of the ones that lives up to its rep. Cruse started out in underground comics and was on the vanguard of doing openly gay-themed comics in that scene for decades when he finally did this masterful novel that took him 4 years to craft and came out, of all places, through one of DC's ill-fated attempts at publishing non-superhero or non-genre fare. The underground style is very obvious in his drawing, which is incredibly detailed and realistic and yet also infused with rubbery cartooniness especially in his faces and the way his characters' often beefy bodies look and move. His craftsmanship is at an incredibly high level here, and it's placed in the service of an intricate, complex story, obviously mined from personal experiences and anecdotes but heavily fictionalized, about a closeted, self-denying gay guy in the South in the 60s, at the height of the counterculture and the civil rights movement. It's great stuff, tying together black rights and gay rights as interlinking scenes and movements, and doing so very organically through a story jam-packed with memorable, richly developed characters. Cruse's pages are always very dense and packed with detail but though a lot of artists with similar styles get pretty ponderous to read very quickly, Cruse's knack for characterization and storytelling ensure that this actually breezes along, it's very involving and enjoyable. It's often deeply and intensely political, even polemical, and the emotional intensity reaches similar peaks at times, but there's a lightness and gracefulness to the storytelling that prevents it from ever bogging down or becoming a chore to read.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:41 am

Yess Stuck Rubber Baby is a stone cold classic. Essential reading for anyone interested in comics and the counter-culture
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Postby murderhorn » Thu Jul 05, 2018 7:17 am

how were you involved with the Heygate demolition? (if you don't mind answering)
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Postby HotFingersClub » Thu Jul 05, 2018 4:24 pm

I work for one of the companies that carried out the demolition. I came on right at the end of our time there but I helped a bit with some of the community engagement stuff (site visits, local employment) and I was working last week with the Southwark Construction Skills Centre which is based there now
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Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:31 am

PS Sevenarts I'm glad I'm not the only one who found the later parts of Henchgirl very strange story-wise. I couldn't work out why this simple, charming book was getting so confusing and I thought I was just falling asleep
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Postby HotFingersClub » Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:27 am

Lots of comics

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Julia Gfrörer – Laid Waste
Gfrörer’s even gloomier follow-up to Black is the Colour is set in a medieval village being wiped out by the plague. It’s very dark, very heavy, but also a quick read, with large close panels that look a bit like woodcuts and a bit like Tony Millionaire. She communicates a great deal of grime and decay with black scratches on white. Really good.

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Gipi – Land of the Sons
Pretty similar vibe to Laid Waste but I haven’t seen anyone talking about this. It’s a European post-apocalyptic story about two brothers who live on the edge of a poisoned lake, having never known society un-collapsed. The art is beautiful – scratchy but clear and atmospheric with a great sense of place. In the end, it’s a bit more of a straightforward adventure story than you might expect or wish for, but it’s persuasive while it lasts.

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Carol Tyler – Late Bloomer
Autobiographical comix spanning about 20 years starting in the late 80s, many of them about growing up in a bickering, working-class family. I gotta say I found it a little hard to pay full attention. There’s not a lot of continuity between the stories and Tyler doesn’t give you much in the way of orientation, with timeframes and characters slip-sliding all over the place. Or maybe it's just that her style is somehow more decentralised than people like Mary Fleener or Gabrielle Bell - it's difficult to know where she is in the story, or to build up a consistent picture of her life. She does some lovely work in the backgrounds, and you can really see her progressing as an artist (she’s an exceptional colourist) but the figurework remains somehow indistinct.

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Zak Sally – Like a Dog
This is a collection of the first two issues of Sally’s zine Recidivist plus some odds and ends. I generally like his stuff okay but his art style doesn’t do a huge amount for me. The narrative strips are the highlight. They don’t let you in too much, or over-explain – they just do their thing and get out of there. Around the edges though there are a lot of illustrated dreams and song lyrics which suit the zine format but are not ultimately very interesting.

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Aude Picault – Limited Edition
What’s the word for this kind of art style? That sort of simple-but-technical expressive cartooning that animators like to use? This is a good example of that. The story is a little French drama about a woman in her early thirties who’s looking for love and finds someone almost suitable but not quite. It’s kind of mature and sensible, maybe a little boring, but an engaging and I think mostly unpatronising look at being a single woman in your thirties. The most interesting angle is the protagonist’s job as a neonatal nurse and how that relates to the ticking of her biological clock, but then it's not quite used to its best advantage, focusing instead on the relationship-based, differences-between-genders stuff that feels a bit more worn out.

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Rosemary Valero-O’Connell – What is Left
A beautiful fluid philosophical scifi story about memory and death, with extraordinary art from someone I gots to admit I’ve never heard of before. Like sevenarts, I felt the mellifluous elegance of Tillie Walden's On a Sunbeam in the way she portrays fantastical spaces, but the specific conceit and the enormous technical skill of the art ended up reminding me more of Katsuhiro Otomo's Magnetic Rose. Very excited to see more from Valero-O’Connell.

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Molly Mendoza – The Worst
Also from Shortbox, but with a more dangerous, jagged feel, a story of neediness and betrayal and suffocating intimacy in a girls’ swimming team, cut through with blood red panels of gaping sharks and other interesting visual effects. Another super accomplished and exciting early work from someone who clearly has a lot of talent. My only complaint is that the characters all look the same (or at least don't have a consistent look) and most of the dialogue and narration is unattributed, so it gets pretty difficult to follow at points, although it doesn't detract too much.

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Emily Carroll – Beneath the Dead Oak Tree
The final of three Shortbox minis, by the most established creator, this is the best of a very strong bunch. Sevenarts covered this well in his review on the last page – it's a simple but heightened horror fairytale starring aristocratic fox people with dark secrets. It's a really welcome return to vibrant colour for Carroll, and the horrific bits are more gory than usual in a way that's really effective and visceral. She makes great use of the length this book affords her – a clear and commanding demonstration of her skill.
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Postby sevenarts » Sat Jul 14, 2018 2:04 pm

Good stuff. I love that Gfrorer book and the Shortbox minis. Guess I should grab that Molly Mendoza one too. I only knew Valero-O'Connell previously for the Lumberjanes issues she drew, which are obviously very different. Looks like What Is Left is her first major personal comic which is pretty amazing.

That Gipi book looks gorgeous.
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Postby sevenarts » Sat Jul 14, 2018 2:28 pm

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When the Wind Blows by Raymond Briggs
Been a very long time since I first read this and it maintains all its impact, just great, harrowing stuff. The juxtaposition between the gentle folksy humor of the presentation and the post-apocalyptic real-world horror of what's happening is really bracing in the best way. Sometimes it's so charmingly low-key funny that it's easy to forget just how horrific it all is. An amazing book, both a very specific, very savage parody of British propaganda from the 80s, and an universal fable for the unspeakable terrors of the nuclear age.

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Ethel and Ernest by Raymond Briggs
HFC mentioned this a bit back and yea, this is really affecting, again in a way that kind of sneaks up on you. Briggs' style is so incredibly charming and so well-suited to capturing the rhythms of everyday life in these brief, lovingly rendered little anecdotes. The book is dedicated to his parents, and documents their entire lives starting from their first random meeting, their courtship, marriage, and beyond. Years pass in pages, and yet each moment seems utterly precious, always infused with gentle humor, absurdity, and unashamed sentimentality. The art is gorgeous, particularly the vivid, impossibly rich painted colors, and Briggs makes these characters come alive so that by the end I feel like I've spent a whole life with them. Briggs renders even tragedy with the most graceful of touches, which only seems to make the sad moments even more unbearable. Really beautiful work.

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My Brother's Husband by Gengoroh Tagame
Really fascinating manga about a single dad whose life is disrupted when his dead gay brother's Canadian husband shows up for a visit. This reminds me I should read way more manga, because it's both a really good read and utterly unlike anything I've seen in Western comics. The unique mix of understated humor, melodrama, and sociopolitical commentary makes it often a deliberately discomfiting read, in ways that seem to deliberately poke at the issues and prejudices the story is dealing with. Lots of probing at ideas about xenophobia, closemindedness, and homophobia, in many ways seemingly specific to Japanese culture and Japanese hangups about gayness and foreignness, but also often all too recognizable from a Western perspective too. The art is generally charming and well-done, and Tagame's beefy male figures are often subject to an openly homoerotic male gaze, which seems like another way of forcing any hesitant readers to confront the sexuality at the core of the book.

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Ulcera by Puiupo & Adonis Pantazopoulos
A short collaboration between 2 Brazilian cartoonists, one of their only works in English. The art is really cool - if I have the separation right, Puiupo draws the first half in a sketchy manga-influenced style, while Pantazopoulos draws the second half in a more stylized, spiky style that reminds me a bit of Malachi Ward. I'll be damned if I can make a lick of sense out of the sci-fi story or the characters though.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Jul 16, 2018 2:19 pm

Aces. Great to see you taking a close look at Raymond Briggs - he's such a lowkey institution here (less for the books and more for The Snowman and Father Christmas) that it's very rare to see him approached critically or be repped by anyone outside the UK. The man's a legend though.

It's an odd book to say this about because it's not exactly gripping but I find myself regularly craving further installments of My Brother's Husband. The roly-poly characters gradually overcoming their prejudices in a calm and thoughtful way is essential for my soul's survival on this gay earth. Is this the feeling that humans call "balm?"
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Postby sevenarts » Tue Jul 17, 2018 7:56 am

My Brother's Husband is definitely balm even though it's also kinda confrontational. Maybe it ultimately being such a reassuring vision is an odd fit with the state of the world but I don't care.
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Postby sevenarts » Sat Jul 21, 2018 5:42 pm

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Poochytown by Jim Woodring
Great new GN starring Woodring's Frank. In preparation I read all Woodring's older series - the 2 volumes of Jim, Tantalizing Stories, and the Frank series. I had the collected editions but had never read this stuff in this form before, it's an interesting experience. The old Jim stories are so nakedly psychological, so nakedly derived from dreams and psychoanalysis, that it's really interesting to see Woodring being so comparatively direct about the underlying ideas behind his work, the musings on morality and mental landscapes are so much more overt than they are in the Frank stories. I think this material is kind of inherently less satisfying, in part because it's so obviously just dream logic while the Frank stories move with their own inscrutable logic that's dreamlike in some ways but in other ways creates a whole alternative world every bit as real as a physical one. It's interesting too to see Frank taking over - there's less and less Jim material in the later comics. The Tantalizing Stories stretch is where the transition really starts to happen pretty heavily, and the other notable thing there is that Woodring's Frank shares the book with Mark Martin's Montgomery Wart, a very different kind of anthropomorphic creation. Martin's forced humor and annoying writing of Southern accents only further accentuates how distinct Woodring's work was (and is) from other comics, even ones ostensibly from the same scene.

Anyway, Poochytown itself is fantastic, it's another densely packed Frank morality tale, this one about an unlikely companionship between Frank and Manhog that results in some great odd couple buddy comedy. Woodring's art is phenomenal, it just keeps getting better and better, and there are some pretty mind-warping spreads here with amazing otherworldly imagery. I've always thought the cowardly, alternately pathetic and evil Manhog is one of Woodring's great creations - such a perfect encapsulation of craven humanity at its worst - so the prolonged focus on him here is great, and I'm especially happy that I re-read stories like "Gentlemanhog" (shout out to HFC) before reading this. A new Woodring Frank novel is always a pleasure and though all of these have been great since he started doing these standalone GNs every couple of years, this one seems especially on-point.

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The Puritan's Wife by Liam Cobb
Like Slow Drift, his minimalist Western, this is more of a straightahead narrative period piece compared to his usual formalist, semi-abstract works. The narrative is pretty classical, even simple, but I still dig its grim directness. Very stark and gloomy tale of a deadly illness striking a puritan commune, leading the commune's increasingly deranged leader to seek a scapegoat. Cobb sets the atmosphere beautifully, creating a claustrophobic mood of dread that helps to sell the story's predictable moves - even knowing from the start basically where it's all heading, the dismal beauty of Cobb's drawings make this compelling. He draws faces with restraint and understatement, eliding features and letting the smallest number of lines convey the emotions roiling beneath the story's surface. Good, dark, harrowing stuff.

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The Leopard by Sarah Horrocks
Like her ongoing series Goro (which I love as well) this is a frequently inscrutable genre piece about mostly unlikeable people crashing into each other in unpredictable ways while dark plots percolate in the background. This seems to be the first volume of a grisly haunted house horror piece, with a squabbling extended family gathering at a desolate house awaiting the death of the family matriarch, fighting and fucking and maybe killing each other as they wait to see who will inherit what. Nasty, bizarre, and frequently absolutely stunning in its layouts, use of color, and outrageous gory over-the-topness. I really admire Horrocks' unconcern with such niceties as reader handholding - both here and in Goro, she throws you in at the deep end with long histories and complex relationships implied in the pattering dialogue, and lets the contours of the plot hide within the vicious scrawls and garish colors of her pages.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Jul 23, 2018 7:22 am

Awesome - didn't know there was a new Woodring coming out. I appreciate the overview of the series as well - I've read all his stuff in a totally random order, and it's interesting to see the arcs of development drawn out like that. He's a really singular talent. I love that story in the introduction of The Frank Book where he sends a drawing of Frank just on his own to another cartoonist saying "What do you think of this? I think it's very interesting," and the other guy's just like ??? this has no meaning

Sarah Horrocks looks really interesting but I've never seen her stuff online or in UK shops so I keep forgetting that I'm supposed to read it
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Postby Wombatz » Mon Jul 23, 2018 6:19 pm

she sells the leopard as a pdf, but i can't recommend that ... looks really dodgy, more like a cheap bootleg, with page formats not quite matching and a bit fuzzy all over ... i just kept thinking how good this would look as a proper book and ended up not really reading it (and not buying the garo pdfs).

(some great posts here while i was on holiday!)
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Postby Conetoaster » Tue Jul 24, 2018 5:35 am

New shortbox is up for pre-order. Looks quite good, has anyone read anything by the authors? is it worth picking up?
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Postby Kenny » Tue Jul 24, 2018 5:50 am

What's your ways of discovering these alt comics? Mostly knowing them from other stuff, or just rolling the dice?

I have a real pull for wanting to buy these and feeling cheap if I discover I don't like them/have more stuff in my place
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Postby HotFingersClub » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:05 am

Conetoaster wrote:New shortbox is up for pre-order. Looks quite good, has anyone read anything by the authors? is it worth picking up?


Sophia Foster-Dimino has been talked about a lot in this thread recently with unanimous praise (between me and Sevenarts anyway). Not familiar with any of the others but I trust Zainab’s judgement (even though she was quite rude in person lol). I’ll definitely pick it up, especially after the great Mendoza, Carroll and Valero-O’Connell books that were reviewed on this page.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:18 am

Kenny wrote:What's your ways of discovering these alt comics? Mostly knowing them from other stuff, or just rolling the dice?

I have a real pull for wanting to buy these and feeling cheap if I discover I don't like them/have more stuff in my place


Hell I guess I get a lot of my recommendations from this thread. Have a read and you’ll find that we frequently review comics and post pages.

Or you could just wander into Gosh or Orbital and flick through the books until you find something you like. It’s usually pretty easy to tell what you’re into and whether you think it’s worth the cost.

I often start with checking out pirated scans at random and then if someone seems good I’ll pay to check out their next project. That’s the way it worked for me with Josh Simmons, Michael DeForge, Lisa Hanawalt and a whole bunch of others.

I can’t wait for Lisa Hanawalt to release new stuff.
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Postby Kenny » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:31 am

I used to go to Orbital all the time but they got mad at me for not picking up my pulls once and I got all scared to go in

That one room with the more "arty" comics is a lot of fun
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Postby HotFingersClub » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:39 am

That's the room I'm talkin about man! Foyles has a surprisingly good selection too and they would never dream of telling you off. That area is the golden triangle of comix
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Postby HotFingersClub » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:40 am

Comics are definitely expensive and not good value for the most part. You gotta be careful
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Postby Kenny » Tue Jul 24, 2018 6:44 am

I really love Comixology for allowing me to buy things that don't take physical space :-S

But it excludes a lot of really interesting stuff like the stuff itt.
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Postby sevenarts » Tue Jul 24, 2018 7:56 am

HotFingersClub wrote:
Conetoaster wrote:New shortbox is up for pre-order. Looks quite good, has anyone read anything by the authors? is it worth picking up?


Sophia Foster-Dimino has been talked about a lot in this thread recently with unanimous praise (between me and Sevenarts anyway). Not familiar with any of the others but I trust Zainab’s judgement (even though she was quite rude in person lol). I’ll definitely pick it up, especially after the great Mendoza, Carroll and Valero-O’Connell books that were reviewed on this page.


Yup Foster-Dimino is the only one I know but that's enough for me to pick it up, the other books look neat too. Will have to grab that Mendoza now too.
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Postby sevenarts » Tue Jul 24, 2018 7:57 am

Hanawalt has a graphic novel out next month from D&Q if you don't know, HFC.
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