what are you reading right now?

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby reversemigraine » Thu Feb 13, 2020 2:13 pm

Image

Studs is balm for me.
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Postby the upland trout » Thu Feb 13, 2020 3:34 pm

Division Street America looks really interesting. Might grab a copy.

After looking up that book I read Terkel's wikipedia entry, saw that he had a television show, and found this on YouTube:

Quite charming.

I've never read Terkel, though I've had a copy of Working forever.
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Postby Merciel » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:06 pm

Finished the Neapolitan Novels. Loved the first three, was a little underwhelmed by the fourth.

Now reading Jenny Offill's _Weather_, which is great halfway through. I'll probably finish it tonight, it's a super quick read.
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Postby scramble » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:15 pm

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This Life offers a profoundly inspiring basis for transforming our lives, demonstrating that our commitment to freedom and democracy should lead us beyond both religion and capitalism. Philosopher Martin Hägglund argues that we need to cultivate not a religious faith in eternity but a secular faith devoted to our finite life together. He shows that all spiritual questions of freedom are inseparable from economic and material conditions: what matters is how we treat one another in this life and what we do with our time.

Engaging with great philosophers from Aristotle to Hegel and Marx, literary writers from Dante to Proust and Knausgaard, political economists from Mill to Keynes and Hayek, and religious thinkers from Augustine to Kierkegaard and Martin Luther King, Jr., Hägglund points the way to an emancipated life.
Kenny wrote:Some day when I am dead, you slow pokes will get that I have been hilarious for years.
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Postby Kenny » Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:42 am

I finished Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer last night.

I probably wouldn't have finished it if I hadn't just listened to a podcast where a couple of guys I like a lot raved about it. The sex stuff and calling every woman a cunt got in the way, but there were real passages of power and eventually when you got used to the vomit I could tell that there was something interesting there. I dunno. I get its place, a 1930s book talking about fucking like people would today, to show that we've always been messy and dirty despite what you can get from popular culture etc. Some of the philosophy that sparked through was really good too.

I probably wouldn't read another Henry Miller book though unless the sex stuff died down, or at least he stopped calling every woman "Cunt", but from a brief look it seems like he just wrote the same thing over and over

I can see 100% how this inspired Kerouac, but I feel like Kerouac did it much better. Or maybe I'm just more hung up on what is life about/spirituality than fucking

and scramble, that book sounds fucking perfect for me
[PEACE] [LOVE] [UNITY] [RESPECT]

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I'm not a player I just crush a lot. ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
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Postby shizaam » Fri Feb 14, 2020 9:55 am

just started Image
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Postby Jeremy » Fri Feb 14, 2020 9:59 am

I feel like I went about 18 months where I literally couldn't read. Easing myself back in with Gibson's The Peripheral. I like how it's kind of written like he knows like reality has caught up with him.
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Postby lefthandshake » Fri Feb 14, 2020 2:53 pm

hey, i've been reading the peripheral too. once i resigned myself to the fact that he's never going to return to his neuromancer style of prose, i've been enjoying it and am glad that he's writing genuine sf again. wish that his made-up brands didn't have such flavo-fibes-ass names though
Image
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Postby i_am_agriculture » Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:32 pm

i_am_agriculture wrote:Image

I ended up with an extra copy of this book. Anyone here interested in it? If you're in the US, I'll mail it to you for free.

Lev Ozerov’s Portraits Without Frames offers fifty shrewd and moving glimpses into the lives of Soviet writers, composers, and artists caught between the demands of art and politics. Some of the subjects—like Anna Akhmatova, Isaac Babel, Andrey Platonov, and Dmitry Shostakovich—are well-known, others less so. All are evoked with great subtlety and vividness, as is the fraught and dangerous time in which they lived. Composed in free verse of deceptively artless simplicity, Ozerov’s portraits are like nothing else in Russian poetry.


I still have this if anyone wants it. Also have a spare copy of this:

Image
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Postby warmhouse » Mon Feb 17, 2020 2:29 am

question for people who have read the Caro LBJ books - is it cool if I just dive in to the later books, or will I be doing a disservice to myself by not reading them chronologically?
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Postby Eyeball Kid » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:29 am

Image
Matei Brunul - Lucian Dan Teodorovici
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Postby ahungbunny » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:34 am

i am ag, i'll gladly take those if you still have 'em. can venmo you to cover media mail as well, pm me if so

currently reading children of time and it's fine
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Postby The Producer » Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:11 am

warmhouse wrote:question for people who have read the Caro LBJ books - is it cool if I just dive in to the later books, or will I be doing a disservice to myself by not reading them chronologically?

yeah I just started on the second one

but powerbrokers the real priority! :ryan:
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Postby hadlex » Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:31 am

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The laughing jumbo of Europe's gay spots.
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Postby HotFingersClub » Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:19 am

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Richard Powers – The Overstory
This guy needs to relax a bit; he’s straining for profundity on every page and it’s a real bummer. Not a good novel.


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Joseph Brodsky – Watermark
I love Venice more than anywhere but didn’t get what I wanted out of this. Lots of people saying it’s “wonderfully evocative”. I got none of that and way too much of this:
I always adhered to the idea that God is time, or at least that His spirit is. Perhaps this idea was even of my own manufacture, but now I don’t remember. In any case, I always thought that if the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the water, the water was bound to reflect it. Hence my sentiment for water, for its folds, wrinkles, and ripples, and – as I am a Northerner – for its grayness…



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Miranda July – The First Bad Man
Unexpectedly loved this. Spare, funny and very strange, like a cross between George Saunders and Muriel Spark. One of the best novels I’ve read recently.


Now:
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Jerome K. Jerome – Three Men in a Boat
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Postby dvr » Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:42 am

Image
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Postby Slamwich Artist » Mon Feb 17, 2020 2:24 pm

over the past couple weeks
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Image
Image
All good in their own way, especially the Ndiaye. Intrigued to read more of her stuff.

Judt book was surprisingly breezy. Would have liked Turkey to have been integrated a bit more into the narrative, although I guess it's justifiable enough to treat it as more of a Middle Eastern country than a European one. Wanted to hear more about Albania and its connections to Mao too. His account of the cultural and intellectual life of the 70s seemed a little narrow-minded and simplistic, just saying punk and "Theory" were bad developments.

Horne was a tour de force, really impressive how he accessibly he presented such a complicated narrative, with important action going in simultaneously in so many different places. Also amazing that Max Boot used the same title but completely without irony, forty years later, for his shitty pro-imperialism book.
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Postby i_am_agriculture » Mon Feb 17, 2020 2:50 pm

Glad you liked The Cheffe, I think I'm her biggest supporter on the board (maybe the only one?). I'd recommend My Heart Hemmed In next!
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Postby Mr Spaceship » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:27 pm

Postwar is so good
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Postby Smerdyakov » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:50 pm

mudd wrote:
mancubz wrote:I got Samantha hunts “the seas” yesterday and I’m halfway through it
I love this weird cold longing aqueous shit


Oh man I loved this book, really took me by surprise. I followed up with a book of her stories which was also really good, in the same sort of small town slipstream way. Looking forward to reading her next couple novels.

I picked it up because Maggie Nelson wrote the intro and will do so again for anything she suggests.

m


I got this at the library after seeing these posts. I really enjoyed it.
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Postby Eyeball Kid » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:54 pm

Eyeball Kid wrote:Image
Matei Brunul - Lucian Dan Teodorovici

I'm only on page 57, but I kinda love this. Alas, unless I'm missing something, only one of LDT's other books has been translated into English, so unless I learn to read Romanian, I don't have much more to explore.
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Postby incoherent grunting » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:57 pm

readin this and i like it so far

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"let's get psychic not blacked out. Let's get wild without getting sick. Let's get turnt while staying woke."
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Postby incoherent grunting » Mon Feb 17, 2020 5:58 pm

oops that's huge but i dont care
"let's get psychic not blacked out. Let's get wild without getting sick. Let's get turnt while staying woke."
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Postby Kenny » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:06 pm

Jut finished:
Image

Sort of ambivalent feelings on this one because it starts off seeming to be a very normal "Middle class woman writes nostalgically of the early 20th century and being rich" and really reminded me of Rose Macaulay and Virginia Woolf. I really love both of those, but I read The Corner That Held Them also by Townsend Warner and it is one of my favorite books I've read in the last 5 years (also Rose Macaulay's The Towers of Trebizond!) so just that sort of same setting was well written but still a disappointment. Then it takes a left turn and gets really interesting and good. The bit at the end where she has a long conversation with the Devil is great, and obviously the whole reason the book was written.
[PEACE] [LOVE] [UNITY] [RESPECT]

You are a sacred being of light projected into reality for a purpose. Demand the right to your moment in this holographic gift with no rules, no borders, except for those who you choose to accept and live by.

I'm not a player I just crush a lot. ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
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Postby Gnarls » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:09 pm

RIP Charles Portis

so many of the best posts remind me of Portis excerpts
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Postby reversemigraine » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:24 pm

Everyone I've met who knew Portis had nothing but nice things to say about him.

Apparently his politics ran to the right, so it's probably a good thing he didn't talk about that kind of stuff in public.
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Postby speakers » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:52 pm

Smerdyakov wrote:
mudd wrote:
mancubz wrote:I got Samantha hunts “the seas” yesterday and I’m halfway through it
I love this weird cold longing aqueous shit


Oh man I loved this book, really took me by surprise. I followed up with a book of her stories which was also really good, in the same sort of small town slipstream way. Looking forward to reading her next couple novels.

I picked it up because Maggie Nelson wrote the intro and will do so again for anything she suggests.

m


I got this at the library after seeing these posts. I really enjoyed it.


this is next up for me, when i finish circe, which is great
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Postby cooly » Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:37 pm

read this last weekend

Image

it was an extremely christian popular story in the middle ages, and it was only later discovered that the story is basically adapted from the story of the buddha. i read it bc it was in an eliot weinberger essay and it seemed interesting, plus i always love continuing the tradition / practice of hearing / reading a story that is ancient and was central to "our culture" historically, even if it's not really remembered today. it's a very simple book. i enjoyed it, but more as an artifact of history than as a work of literature.
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
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Postby mkslz » Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:43 pm

I've just started reading Nabokov's Speak, Memory. so far he seems to enjoy describing his weird precious aesthete tendencies in great detail eg. routinely wrapping some rock/gem in a bedsheet as a child and sucking on it until soaked (ok), and how like every letter in the alphabet is a different colour/texture. he does also admit he's a total philistine when it comes to music (he describes it as like a series of passing events of varying annoyance which sounds p wack and unfortunate i think although i know other people like my lame sis who feel similarly ). it has very many beautiful passages as well, like for example the end of the first chapter: "In the dining room, my brother and I would be told to go on with our food. My mother, a tidbit
between finger and thumb, would glance under the table to see if her nervous and gruff dachshund was
there. “Un jour ils vont le laisser tomber,” would come from Mlle Golay, a primly pessimistic old
lady who had been my mother’s governess and still dwelt with us (on awful terms with our own
governesses). From my place at table I would suddenly see through one of the west windows a
marvelous case of levitation. There, for an instant, the figure of my father in his wind-rippled white
summer suit would be displayed, gloriously sprawling in midair, his limbs in a curiously casual
attitude, his handsome, imperturbable features turned to the sky. Thrice, to the mighty heave-ho of his
invisible tossers, he would fly up in this fashion, and the second time he would go higher than the first
and then there he would be, on his last and loftiest flight, reclining, as if for good, against the cobalt
blue of the summer noon, like one of those paradisiac personages who comfortably soar, with such a
wealth of folds in their garments, on the vaulted ceiling of a church while below, one by one, the wax
tapers in mortal hands light up to make a swarm of minute flames in the mist of incense, and the priest
chants of eternal repose, and funeral lilies conceal the face of whoever lies there, among the
swimming lights, in the open coffin."
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Now he's talking about the various types of hallucinations he experiences and im feeling it, esp the passing reference to floaters as "muscae
volitantes" -- to be distinguished from the refined "hypnagogic mirages" Nabby himself is privy too.
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Postby Slamwich Artist » Mon Feb 17, 2020 8:55 pm

cooly wrote:read this last weekend

Image

it was an extremely christian popular story in the middle ages, and it was only later discovered that the story is basically adapted from the story of the buddha. i read it bc it was in an eliot weinberger essay and it seemed interesting, plus i always love continuing the tradition / practice of hearing / reading a story that is ancient and was central to "our culture" historically, even if it's not really remembered today. it's a very simple book. i enjoyed it, but more as an artifact of history than as a work of literature.

Image
Have you read this? Similar trajectory to Barlaam and Ioasaf. The Arabic version (Kalila wa-Dimna) was enormously popular, maybe the most widely circulated and translated “secular” work of the Middle Ages.

Edit: it’s also all about animals fucking each other over, so maybe a little more of a crowd-pleaser than Barlaam. There’s also a really interesting couple of introductory chapters that were apparently written by the guy who translated it from Sanskrit into Persian in pre-Islamic Iran, where he talks about how he can’t bring himself to believe in any religion.
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