what are you reading right now?

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby chowder julius » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:50 am

remains of the day is good but i've been disappointed in other ishiguro. his voice works well with the subject matter of rotd but felt out of place and boring in never let me go
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Postby chowder julius » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:50 am

also i started reading the towers of trebizond rather than play as it lays. i want to read something a bit more lighthearted
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Postby Kenny » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:55 am

Nice, that was one of my favorite books I read last year. I wonder what you'll think of it!

I really like the narrator's (spoilers only if you want to know nothing about the book, it's not really spoilery) religious ambivalence but wanting to believe in something but not really believingToggle Spoiler which is basically my life story
[PEACE] [LOVE] [UNITY] [RESPECT]

You are a sacred being of light projected into reality for a purpose. Demand the right to your moment in this holographic gift with no rules, no borders, except for those who you choose to accept and live by.

Fuck being hard, Petty is complicated. ᕦ(ò_óˇ)ᕤ
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Postby i_am_agriculture » Mon Apr 15, 2019 2:03 pm

Towers of Trebizond is great. I’ll be interested in hearing how you like it, since it has a very specific humor that probably doesn’t appeal to everyone (like dunking on Billy Graham).
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Postby i_am_agriculture » Mon Apr 15, 2019 2:06 pm

HotFingersClub wrote:Image
Italo Calvino - Mr Palomar
Some fun noodling from Calvino. Gets very deep sometimes, taking long dives off tiny bits of visual information. RIYL Nicholson Baker's The Mezzanine

Also RIYL cheese :)
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Postby Eyeball Kid » Mon Apr 15, 2019 3:16 pm

Image

Orson Welles: The Road to Xanadu, by Simon Callow

I so rarely read nonfiction of any stripe because I'm a committed prose stylist, but hey, Callow has a way with words. I'll get to the other two volumes soon rather than later.
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Postby Smerdyakov » Mon Apr 15, 2019 5:42 pm

Recently finished Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things. Her writing is so good; it was very touching.

Before that, I read Vargas Llosa's Feast of the Goat. I didn't really get into it until about halfway through, but then it gripped me the rest of the way. It's a really tragic story.
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Postby adam sampler » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:38 pm

reversemigraine wrote:
adam sampler wrote:Finally picked up Gilead last week


Kinda feel like Essex County and Robinson's trilogy have a common vibe.

Huh, interesting to hear
Loved Book 1 in a sort of cutesy-sad way, and loving the second one too though it's much more raw. Really wish I found these in high school.
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Postby conductor » Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:48 pm

Image

Loving this. Considering it and Arabia Felix are two of my favorites from the past year, does anyone have any explore-y reccs? I've read Lost City of Z and Tim Jeal's Stanley biography.
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Postby incoherent grunting » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:30 pm

conductor wrote: does anyone have any explore-y reccs? I've read Lost City of Z and Tim Jeal's Stanley biography.

Alone on the Ice by David Roberts was good
and.. have you read Into Thin Air? It's less 'explorer' but it's still a similar/good vibe imo
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Postby hadlex » Mon Apr 15, 2019 11:24 pm

conductor wrote:Image

Loving this. Considering it and Arabia Felix are two of my favorites from the past year, does anyone have any explore-y reccs? I've read Lost City of Z and Tim Jeal's Stanley biography.


Image

This one is totally insane.
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Postby abs » Mon Apr 15, 2019 11:36 pm

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☽ ☾ ● ◯ ● ☽ ☾
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Postby incoherent grunting » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:23 am

What are the best outdoor/environmental/conservation books that aren't boring or overly preachy?

(the main ones I know are Desert Solitaire, A Sand County Almanac, John Muir stuff, ???. This request is based on my enjoyment of The Overstory, and depression about the state of the world)
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Postby tawny frogmouth » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:36 am

incoherent grunting wrote:What are the best outdoor/environmental/conservation books that aren't boring or overly preachy?


i worked on this when it came out, got to spend time with the author and her husband. really lovely people, and the book is great. she's a poet and philosopher, so the writing is stylistically beautiful while being part memoir, part history of the parks she visits.

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Postby dvr » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:40 am

conductor wrote:Image

Loving this. Considering it and Arabia Felix are two of my favorites from the past year, does anyone have any explore-y reccs? I've read Lost City of Z and Tim Jeal's Stanley biography.


Image

Image
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Postby dvr » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:43 am

incoherent grunting wrote:What are the best outdoor/environmental/conservation books that aren't boring or overly preachy?


This was an interesting insight to the NPS. Had some red tape/politics stuff but mostly takes place outdoors


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Postby dvr » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:46 am

incoherent grunting wrote:
conductor wrote: does anyone have any explore-y reccs? I've read Lost City of Z and Tim Jeal's Stanley biography.

Alone on the Ice by David Roberts was good
and.. have you read Into Thin Air? It's less 'explorer' but it's still a similar/good vibe imo



Seconding Alone on the Ice.

I much preferred The Climb by Anatoli Boukreev to Into Thin Air.
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Postby deadbass » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:48 am

I finally finished Nixonland after stopping and starting it since 2013. I really enjoyed it, but I do think that Perlstein has a tendency to make sweeping pronouncements about the social mood of a given week based on reading some op-eds in the papers of record. It's insane how thoroughly researched it is though. Also was bummed about where it ended, although I totally understand the decision. Really wanted to hear his angle on Nixon during and immediately after Watergate.
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Postby reversemigraine » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:49 am

deadbass wrote:I finally finished Nixonland after stopping and starting it since 2013. I really enjoyed it, but I do think that Perlstein has a tendency to make sweeping pronouncements about the social mood of a given week based on reading some op-eds in the papers of record. It's insane how thoroughly researched it is though. Also was bummed about where it ended, although I totally understand the decision. Really wanted to hear his angle on Nixon during and immediately after Watergate.


The Invisible Bridge is basically a direct continuation.
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Postby deadbass » Wed Apr 17, 2019 12:07 pm

reversemigraine wrote:
deadbass wrote:I finally finished Nixonland after stopping and starting it since 2013. I really enjoyed it, but I do think that Perlstein has a tendency to make sweeping pronouncements about the social mood of a given week based on reading some op-eds in the papers of record. It's insane how thoroughly researched it is though. Also was bummed about where it ended, although I totally understand the decision. Really wanted to hear his angle on Nixon during and immediately after Watergate.


The Invisible Bridge is basically a direct continuation.


d'oh, I never read the subtitle on it - I was always under the impression that it just focussed on the Reagan campaign and presidency (I'm realizing now that he's coming out with a new book that covers that). It makes sense that he's just writing on a continuum. Anyways thanks for letting me know! Here comes another 900 page volume.
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Postby adam sampler » Wed Apr 17, 2019 2:19 pm

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Postby reversemigraine » Wed Apr 17, 2019 2:54 pm

deadbass wrote:
reversemigraine wrote:
deadbass wrote:I finally finished Nixonland after stopping and starting it since 2013. I really enjoyed it, but I do think that Perlstein has a tendency to make sweeping pronouncements about the social mood of a given week based on reading some op-eds in the papers of record. It's insane how thoroughly researched it is though. Also was bummed about where it ended, although I totally understand the decision. Really wanted to hear his angle on Nixon during and immediately after Watergate.


The Invisible Bridge is basically a direct continuation.


d'oh, I never read the subtitle on it - I was always under the impression that it just focussed on the Reagan campaign and presidency (I'm realizing now that he's coming out with a new book that covers that). It makes sense that he's just writing on a continuum. Anyways thanks for letting me know! Here comes another 900 page volume.


In that case, you might also want to go back and read Before the Storm, which was the first book in the series.
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Postby hadlex » Wed Apr 17, 2019 2:57 pm

I came here to post River of Doubt. Great book. I really like Millard as a populist historian.
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Postby hadlex » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:00 pm

Currently blasting through this fascinating curio:

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Postby alaska » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:01 pm

u might've heard of this already but there's a great episode of the wonderful podcast "the relentless picnic" partially about that george w.s. trow book
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Postby reversemigraine » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:17 pm

I've had that on my to-read list since reading Als' "GWTW" -- need to get around to finding a copy.
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Postby hadlex » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:26 pm

alaska wrote:u might've heard of this already but there's a great episode of the wonderful podcast "the relentless picnic" partially about that george w.s. trow book


Oh, rad. Thanks. I'll check that out. I've never really read anything like it before.
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Postby nocents » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:26 pm

incoherent grunting wrote:What are the best outdoor/environmental/conservation books that aren't boring or overly preachy?

(the main ones I know are Desert Solitaire, A Sand County Almanac, John Muir stuff, ???. This request is based on my enjoyment of The Overstory, and depression about the state of the world)


seconding the Hour of the Land.

Also Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard. It's this beautiful meditation on nature/our place in it. It won the Pulitzer in the '70s. The prose is sometimes a bit showy? But it's so good.

This article on her is also good: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2015/02/the-thoreau-of-the-suburbs/385128/
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Postby shacky » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:36 pm

john updike keeps making me fall asleep
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Postby shacky » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:38 pm

also i look at this photo and all i see is milhouse
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