what are you reading right now?

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby shizaam » Wed Feb 05, 2020 5:39 pm

this is so good
Image
User avatar

shizaam
 
Posts: 1696
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 3:28 pm

Postby cooly » Wed Feb 05, 2020 5:42 pm

Yea I posted this a page ago but an elemental thing is one of my favorite books. Jealous you’re reading for the first time
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
User avatar

cooly
 
Posts: 9079
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:52 am

Postby shizaam » Wed Feb 05, 2020 5:50 pm

cooly wrote:Yea I posted this a page ago but an elemental thing is one of my favorite books. Jealous you’re reading for the first time

yah had never heard of it until this thread. thx!
User avatar

shizaam
 
Posts: 1696
Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 3:28 pm

Postby speakers » Wed Feb 05, 2020 7:04 pm

looks like you can read the whole thing free on google books

re: an elemental thing
User avatar

speakers
 
Posts: 17762
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 5:24 pm

Postby Milquetoaster Strudels » Thu Feb 06, 2020 12:24 am

I had started American Pastoral but stopped after 50 or so pages. It's good, but not quite what I'm looking for rn, so I started up In Praise of Idleness and i'm thinking Inventing the Future will be a good follow up
User avatar

Milquetoaster Strudels
 
Posts: 12284
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 8:14 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Postby saranclaps » Thu Feb 06, 2020 2:05 am

Simon rich books
They're not high art but fun enough
Real Love wrote:every once in a while saranclaps will try to do a funny and it's an extremely off note but I'm not totally convinced he's aware of what is happening
User avatar

saranclaps
 
Posts: 20666
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:49 pm
Location: vasing for interludes

Postby mudd » Thu Feb 06, 2020 9:42 am

So I’ve finally started satantango by laszlo krasznahorkai. It’s excellent so far and while I’m only about 15% in I can finally address cooly mccolvin’s request for similar recommendations.

If you’re in it for the setting, Wolfgang Hilbig’s the old rendering plant may have taken place in the same scrapped-out town.

However if what you’re after is more the style, as well as the sort of malaise and moral shrug that so far has driven all the action, this book is a southern gothic. Sure, the south is an east, but there is the same technological lag, small-town misery.

So look to Faulkner, O’Conner, and McCarthy before he went western. Pretty influential styles so you could find a bunch more developing from there, I’ll think about it more as I continue through the book. Tennessee Williams also comes to mind, although unlike the others there isn’t style overlap exactly. Try Wise Blood, A Light in August, Suttree, Child of God. Maybe even The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. Probably you’ve already read several of those, and if so I’d be curious if the aspect I’m talking about is present in LK’s other books, maybe you can comment?

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

Postby cooly » Thu Feb 06, 2020 10:25 am

thanks for the post mudd! also glad that you're enjoying satantango. now that i've read most of his work (still need to get to war & war and a a story collection) i can say that if you enjoy satantango it's definitely worth exploring his other work.

i've actually only read, of those, tennessee williams and a light in august. i have 'child of god' in my 'to-read' shelf at home, though.

the thing that appeals to me most about LK is less the setting and topic and more the intricate, dense writing style with the long, beautiful sentences. i guess this makes faulkner a great recommendation. i also like the way certain characters (e.g. the doctor, if you've encountered him) are almost manifestations of ideas and the way things feel sort of allegorical (i think LK borrows from dostoevsky a lot, and i need to read more dostoevsky) in his work, but not in a reductive way-- they're intricate webs of ideas that don't have straightforward translations into morals or "takeaway" lessons. satantango reminds me more of beckett than any other writer, probably.

i know i'm only reading a translation (and this is such a credit to his two main translators), but the prose in those books is really like nothing i've encountered in other contemporary writing.

i'm not well-read at all in fiction. there was a point in my life (freshman year in college) when i was very well-read for my age, but once i became interested in philosophy and pursued it seriously as a student both undergrad and in grad school i basically felt like i had to be reading philosophy exclusively for my work, and now i'm trying to catch up. i basically read 0 novels for like 10 years. this is all to say that even things that seem obvious, or that you think i definitely have already read, i probably haven't read.

hopefully the way i describe LK doesn't seem too off-base for the other LK fans on the board. i'm not as good a literary reader as many of you and i hope my framework for thinking about him doesn't strike you as wildly off-base.
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
User avatar

cooly
 
Posts: 9079
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:52 am

Postby Kenny » Thu Feb 06, 2020 10:40 am

I've always loved reading obituaries and I was just wondering if there are any good recommendations for something like a collection of obituaries or something like that.

For instance, I read Evelyn Waugh's biography of the priest Ronald Knox and really enjoyed it because even though it was the story of a pretty normal (and sort of boring if you state the stark facts) it was a book long obituary to a friend.
Image [PEACE] [LOVE] [UNITY] [RESPECT] ImageImage

You are a sacred being of light projected into reality for a purpose. Demand the right to your moment in this holographic gift with no rules, no borders, except for those who you choose to accept and live by.

Just wanna play videogames all the time and everyday.
User avatar

Kenny
"Two Phones" Maccabee
 
Posts: 1418
Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:04 am
Location: The thousand-petaled lotus

Postby mudd » Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:19 am

Bolano wrote a collection of fake obituaries Kenny. Don’t think that’s what you have in mind, though.

And cooly, those long tangled sentences that you’re into are kind of a modernist mode, and correspondingly not super popular in the last 10 years or so of fiction. I’m sure there are some great counter examples, but I can’t think of any right now. As a style it probably ties back to Dostoevsky (recently read the idiot, it was quite good) and definitely passes through Joyce and Faulkner, but Gaddis is my favorite practitioner. He leans towards wit and critique more than philosophy though.

McCarthy tends to use that method of manifesting ideas into characters, sometimes too much so. I haven’t met the doctor yet, I’ll see if he’s done similarly.

Beckett doesn’t quite click for me because his work is no internal, so caught up inside the head that the narrative is inseparable from the thoughts. Have you read Mann or Bernhard? They also draw a lot from the modernist mode, though to a much more philosophical edge that will either feel very familiar or unnecessarily tangled.

And finally I would propose Toni Morrison as another author who writes of squalor with great beauty. She loves her characters more than most of the other writers I’ve been talking about, but maybe still fits into the same category.

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

Postby cooly » Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:45 am

thanks again mudd. the idiot is actual one of the few dostoevsky novels i have read, and brothers karamazov is on my short list of things to read this year ( :oops: at not having read this already).

i love joyce, need to read more faulkner, haven't yet read mccarthy (tho i own both child of god and blood meridian.) i've only read the loser from bernhard, but i know i need to read wittgenstein's nephew (especially bc i spent so much time actually working on wittgenstein). haven't read mann aside from death in venice, but i own both faustus and magic mountain and will move them up on the list.

i would like to revisit toni morrison as an adult. as a high schooler i wasn't that into her, but i could see my current self appreciating her work more.

thanks again!

also, i applaud your courage in maintaining your "m" post-outro / signature now that ernie has become a board villain and people were bashing the "l8 e". "l8 e" is obnoxious in a way that "m" isn't though. i'm mostly impressed that anyone manages to remember to sig their posts bc most of my posts are made in like 15 seconds with more grammatical errors than coherent sentences and i could never remember to do something in every single post.
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
User avatar

cooly
 
Posts: 9079
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:52 am

Postby winjer » Thu Feb 06, 2020 12:06 pm

Kenny wrote:I've always loved reading obituaries and I was just wondering if there are any good recommendations for something like a collection of obituaries or something like that.


check out Fénéon‘s ‘novels in three lines’ if you haven’t
User avatar

winjer
 
Posts: 2458
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 6:27 pm
Location: cheese & pickled onion

Postby cooly » Thu Feb 06, 2020 12:12 pm

oh actually kenny, i'm not sure if this is what you're looking for really, but i'm intending to start this soon

Image

(well... i'm intending to start vol. 1 but this was the picture that came up on google image)

it's my understanding that it consists in a number of relatively brief biographies (48 biographies, something like 1500 pages, so you do the math) of important figures in greek and roman history, alongside some essays comparing greeks to the romans. it is also my understanding that, given the time it was written (2nd century) it is not a 100% reliable work of history but something between biography, folklore / mythology, oral history, and moral tales. it might scratch the itch, but it's obviously a huge commitment. i'll let you know my feelings on it once i start it, if you're curious.
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
User avatar

cooly
 
Posts: 9079
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:52 am

Postby mudd » Thu Feb 06, 2020 12:28 pm

I haven’t read the loser but wittegenstein’s nephew is actually my least favorite Bernhard of the 6 or so I have. Just as a word of caution. Anyway it seems like you’ll have plenty of good things to read, whether or not they scratch the right itch.

And as for my signature I don’t actually read the board anymore, just visiting 2-3 threads when it crosses my mind. If someone would like to tarnish my legacy they are more than welcome.

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

Postby lefthandshake » Thu Feb 06, 2020 4:10 pm

i'm only about two pages into satantango, but i see similarities with old rendering plant's style in addition to the setting. dense, beautiful sentences that require some effort to unpack, anyway.

correction features a suicided subject character that's based on wittgenstein and is so much better than wittgenstein's nephew
Image
User avatar

lefthandshake
 
Posts: 1452
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2012 12:35 pm
Location: orgy of caring

Postby cooly » Thu Feb 06, 2020 4:24 pm

noted. i'll go with correction over WN. thanks both of you
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
User avatar

cooly
 
Posts: 9079
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:52 am

Postby bongo » Thu Feb 06, 2020 4:27 pm

rereading mcelroy’s Plus right now which is one of the most remarkable sci-fi books i’ve ever read

also reading book 2 in the gormenghast series (i loved titus groan) and peter o’leary’s earth is best
yeaaaaaaaaaaaa american nostalgia love it suburban living civilized families this could be my life
User avatar

bongo
man in hammock
 
Posts: 69535
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:32 pm
Location: Malaise (Live Acoustic)

Postby saranclaps » Thu Feb 06, 2020 4:30 pm

also tried to read less by Andrew Sean Greer but i think i'm burned out on books about writers.
Real Love wrote:every once in a while saranclaps will try to do a funny and it's an extremely off note but I'm not totally convinced he's aware of what is happening
User avatar

saranclaps
 
Posts: 20666
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:49 pm
Location: vasing for interludes

Postby Riverchrist » Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:07 pm

I started re-reading Titus Groan (a tremendous decision) and two randos have already chatted me up about it. That seems like quite a coincidence unless the series gained new popularity in the last decade.

Anyway it's like playing a classic RPG for only the second time. Lots of favorite parts you're eager to re-experience but still lots of other bits you forgot. Leveling up in a Gormenghast RPG would suck a lot though.
User avatar

Riverchrist
 
Posts: 9591
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:07 pm
Location: Ohmtown

Postby Riverchrist » Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:08 pm

is Swelter basically Cartman
User avatar

Riverchrist
 
Posts: 9591
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:07 pm
Location: Ohmtown

Postby bongo » Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:23 pm

it’s Well Regarded in my circles. titus groan is so good, the rooftop shit and the sisters tree thing. just really cool locations. so far book 2 is just as good


swelter is amazing
yeaaaaaaaaaaaa american nostalgia love it suburban living civilized families this could be my life
User avatar

bongo
man in hammock
 
Posts: 69535
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:32 pm
Location: Malaise (Live Acoustic)

Postby mudd » Thu Feb 06, 2020 9:21 pm

I never managed to read Titus alone because my college library copy had gone missing. I’m afraid I’d have to reread the first two to get to it and that’s too imposing.

Also I really need to reread plus. I read it a long time ago and understood nearly nothing. I am hopefully better equipped now.

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

Postby mancubz » Sat Feb 08, 2020 4:12 pm

Image
just finished it and oh man that ending really fuckin surprised meToggle Spoiler
i'm so sad now!
Stuntman wrote:This is what happens when you're an adolescent and you don't have a forest or the internet.


Johan POOPLER wrote: i'd rather live another 50 years with an untouched nutsack than be rent from the platonic embrace of my sweet, beloved bitch.
User avatar

mancubz
BAD BITCH ALERT
 
Posts: 12244
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 5:22 pm

Postby Kenny » Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:23 am

I read Baron Corvo's book Hadrian The Seventh after reading his biography The Quest for Corvo (which was amazing)

The book is basically the fever dream of somebody with a persecution complex and about how great he is and how stupid everybody else is. He (the main character is exactly him) becomes pope and then he goes on long diatribes about what the Truth is and the book finishes with a long 20 page diatribe against a real life exposing article about how Baron Corvo would move to a place and abuse kindness tillt hey kicked him out. The style of writing is very distinctive and odd, parts of it were really pretty and interesting but the whole time you're reading the document of a kind of crazy and very lonely person

I wonder what I would have thought of it if I had read it before the biography and didn't know he was a grifter, maybe I would have been inclined to believe him as a better person than he was. Still he wasn't a monster, just a person with problems in a heavy world. Not a really FUN read but a definite interesting one
Image [PEACE] [LOVE] [UNITY] [RESPECT] ImageImage

You are a sacred being of light projected into reality for a purpose. Demand the right to your moment in this holographic gift with no rules, no borders, except for those who you choose to accept and live by.

Just wanna play videogames all the time and everyday.
User avatar

Kenny
"Two Phones" Maccabee
 
Posts: 1418
Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:04 am
Location: The thousand-petaled lotus

Postby mudd » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:29 am

mancubz wrote:just finished it and oh man that ending really fuckin surprised meToggle Spoiler
i'm so sad now!


That that was a knife blow. Really good book.

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

Postby bongo » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:33 am

mudd wrote:Also I really need to reread plus. I read it a long time ago and understood nearly nothing. I am hopefully better equipped now.


you def should. if you decide to and would like, i can scan some of the pieces in the mcelroy edition of TROCF from spring ‘90. there are some really insightful analyses in there for all his novels (besides cannonball)
yeaaaaaaaaaaaa american nostalgia love it suburban living civilized families this could be my life
User avatar

bongo
man in hammock
 
Posts: 69535
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 10:32 pm
Location: Malaise (Live Acoustic)

Postby mancubz » Sun Feb 09, 2020 1:24 pm

I got Samantha hunts “the seas” yesterday and I’m halfway through it
I love this weird cold longing aqueous shit
Stuntman wrote:This is what happens when you're an adolescent and you don't have a forest or the internet.


Johan POOPLER wrote: i'd rather live another 50 years with an untouched nutsack than be rent from the platonic embrace of my sweet, beloved bitch.
User avatar

mancubz
BAD BITCH ALERT
 
Posts: 12244
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 5:22 pm

Postby cooly » Sun Feb 09, 2020 1:51 pm

read this last night / this morning

Image

it has more of an agenda than you'd expect from the publisher / title. it's guided by the idea that shiki was partly responsible for misrepresenting the haiku tradition, leading to the popular rigid conception of 5/7/5 poems that focus on particular images / moments, tending to concern nature and perhaps being guided by a zen philosophy. the book links haiku to earlier japanese traditions where poems were composed as a playful social activity, with poets writing poems in response to one another (sometimes such that the second poem changes the interpretation / meaning of the first poem) in linked chains. the book engages with that tradition by presenting poems as engaging with one another. it also undermines the popular conception of haiku by presenting poems concerning more vulgar subject matters.

interesting book, and i enjoyed it, though i still find haiku-as-image really beautiful and interesting
can wrote:old lady [whispering]
User avatar

cooly
 
Posts: 9079
Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 11:52 am

Postby mudd » Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:56 pm

mancubz wrote:I got Samantha hunts “the seas” yesterday and I’m halfway through it
I love this weird cold longing aqueous shit


Oh man I loved this book, really took me by surprise. I followed up with a book of her stories which was also really good, in the same sort of small town slipstream way. Looking forward to reading her next couple novels.

I picked it up because Maggie Nelson wrote the intro and will do so again for anything she suggests.

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

Postby mudd » Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:59 pm

bongo wrote:
mudd wrote:Also I really need to reread plus. I read it a long time ago and understood nearly nothing. I am hopefully better equipped now.


you def should. if you decide to and would like, i can scan some of the pieces in the mcelroy edition of TROCF from spring ‘90. there are some really insightful analyses in there for all his novels (besides cannonball)


Oh that would be pretty helpful! If you do I’m sure it will motivate me to follow through on the read, but take your time.

I actually own a copy of trocf, but not that issue. Richard Powers/ Rikki Duccornet, for some odd reason.

m
mudd
 
Posts: 7519
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:54 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Mamma Mia... Here We Go Again....

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ASH NERVE, Autarch, Big Oil, Chyet, deer, Down n dirty rufus, Google [Bot], haddonfield, hologram, Hoxha, jalapeño ranch, john plainman 5, KALM, LaAbeja, Longarm, mactheo, marble, neta, nvrmind, peanut, polybius, Poptone, scrumptown, shirts optional, Sissy Spacerock, Slay Da Pink Fleshy Beast, Sobieski, spix et chicho, This Guy, timbrrr, tonybricker, truncated, unome, unsandpiper, warmjets, winjer, worrywort