last movie watched.

Health insurance rip off lying FDA big bankers buying
Fake computer crashes dining
Cloning while they're multiplying
Fashion shoots with Beck and Hanson
Courtney Love, and Marilyn Manson
You're all fakes
Run to your mansions
Come around
We'll kick your ass in

Postby mondrary » Fri Dec 20, 2019 12:02 am

Yi Yi (Edward Yang, 2000)
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jesus christ. it's a five. it's unbelievable how edward yang captures the unbelievable, unspeakable beauty of everyday life while also mining the depths of its casual tragedy. he centers us around a family dealing with the family matriarch's stroke and ensuing coma to tell a story of how each and every character yearns to be the architect of their own lives. the father finds himself reintroduced to his first love some 30 years or so after they last spoke, and with his wife away at a buddhist temple attempting to find meaning for herself, he tries to rekindle or at least "relive his youth" (as he puts it) in an attempt to spark excitement. he regrets breaking it off abruptly with this woman when they were together decades ago, and regret is very much at the core of this film -- yang acknowledges the seeming contradiction of the fact that we are in control of the micro- details of life but have legitimately no say on their macro- impact and how our decisions will affect us moving forward, whether or not we consider the moves we make mistakes. the characters in this film are doomed to repeat the same mistakes as their parents' or repeatedly try to rewrite their own lives' histories to correct past mistakes, stumbling forward and hurting themselves more in the process, blind to what brings them actual happiness and contentedness.

the child character, yang-yang, is an eight-year-old obsessed with the things in life he doesn't understand, and he simultaneously looks for and runs from a broader truth that holds the answers to the questions he (nor the adults in his life) have answers to. he's the only one in the family who refuses to spend time speaking to the comatose grandmother, and he later explains, in his own words, that he thinks anything he says to her would be something that she already knows. i'll spare you the details of his final scene in the film, but it's one of the most unbelievably touching and beautiful denouements to any film i have ever seen in my life. since he's only a child, it seems like the other characters project innocence onto him. he's a blank slate for them, someone who hasn't been able to make a mistake yet, and all of these characters seem to have already made their mistakes and are now holding on tightly, hoping that some unknowable force will make things fairer for them.

but, ultimately, that's what we love movies for, i guess. the daughter, ting-ting, at one point goes to see a movie with "Fatty," a boy around her age that she begins to date when the relationship between him and her neighbor fizzles out. her appraisal of the movie they see is that it was unnecessarily sad and she doesn't like to watch "sad movies", which feels like some level of self-awareness on the part of yang, but then i think "Fatty," however humiliating and uncomfortable his character may be, may act as a stand-in for yang's own project in making this film. life is a mixture of happy and sad parts, fatty says, and films need to hew to that standard. later, fatty berates ting-ting, yelling at her that "life is not what you dreamed it to be," or "not like your movies," or whatever. it's impossible for us to re-structure our own lives and things don't always have logical causes-and-effects like they do in movies.

there's more i can write but i don't have it all gathered yet -- i didn't intend to write this much when i sat down to type this up! what i haven't mentioned is edward yang's pitch-perfect direction and the unbelievably evocative and beautiful work the cinematographer, yeung wai-hon, does to express all of the longing and distance that the screenplay and the actors (uniformly incredible performances) conjure. many shots are composed so that we see them as we see a reflection off of a window, trapped in our own interiors but always reminded of the bustle of the outside. pretty much a perfect movie. watch it!
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Postby Plainsong » Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:26 am

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Wise Blood (1979)- John Huston
Loved this. Filled with solid performances, especially from Stanton, Beatty, and Brad Dourif. Really makes me want to read the novel.
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Woman On The Run (1950)- Norman Foster
This ruled. Loved the build up of the plot in a quite a breezy amount of time. Sheridan and Robert Kieth's performances were the stand outs for me.
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Woman They Almost Lynched (1953)- Allan Dwan
This owned so much.
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Wuthering Heights (2011)- Andrea Arnold
Really liked the gritty feel of this. Hopefully this will be the "adaptation to end all adaptations". At least in terms of film anyway.
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You And Me (1938)- Fritz Lang
This ruled.
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You Only Live Once (1937)- Fritz Lang
One of my fav Lang's.
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Postby palmer eldritch » Fri Dec 20, 2019 9:37 am

you and me is a classic
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Postby it's the suspense that gets me » Fri Dec 20, 2019 12:11 pm

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bringing out the dead (1999)

this is probably the fullest nic cage performance? like if someone asked me to show a film that sold his appeal, in all of it's facets, this is the one i would pick. maybe throw in a compilation of his scenes in "deadfall" for good measure. like in terms of 'night bus cinema' with one of his all time performances, this was really directly up my alley in ways i didn't expect going in. all i wanted was to see a cage movie made by a director i had been digging deep into recently and got a fair bit more than that.

the overbearing score in this film is fucking egregious. it's such a beautiful city symphony of new york at night & has such great ambient sound design in certain parts yet... they felt the need to add that in? surprisingly, most of the hollywoodish sentimentality actually worked in me due to how lived in schrader's script felt like to me. like, it clearly loves just about every single one of it's characters and has a very good sense of humor. if i had watched this in 1999 i would've found the subplot regarding "red death" to be absurd but hey fent cut heroin is just the norm now. in a lot of my ways, it's my platonic ideal of what a sentimental hollywood picture should be like. is that what "balm" is? like, maps out the terrain i wanted the crow (1994) to do. about a sad conflicted goth batman instead of a fascist one. also, i think the fact that cage immediately makes one think of "leaving las vegas" which is another film with incredible neon lighting, yet also, one of the worst "hooker with a heart of gold" stories i can think of makes it's qualities stand out when put side to side with it imo, esp. given how much this film acknowledges and plays with that concept. which, again, wouldn't work at all if it didn't have empathy for every single person it depicts roaming the streets of nyc. i could hear arguments to the contrary on that but i bought what this film was selling.

the ending was legitimately very sweet. rhames/sizemore/goodman all made great cage foils. could've maybe been trimmed 10-15 minutes, let the city streets speak for themselves a little more, but gotta say i had a grand ole' time with this one.
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Postby it's the suspense that gets me » Fri Dec 20, 2019 12:12 pm

the idea of nicolas cage reading "journey to the end of the night" is really funny to me but i also buy it, really.
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Postby goofjan » Fri Dec 20, 2019 2:59 pm

yeah, that one's underrated. great ending, great final shot.
plz if u get a chanse put some flowrs on algernons grave kthxbye
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Postby palmer eldritch » Fri Dec 20, 2019 3:12 pm

"one of marty's best" movies -- as it goes
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Postby razzle » Sat Dec 21, 2019 1:22 am

Watching the Witches (1990 Roeg) and why was he allowed to make childens films? This is traumatic to rewatch
At least we have
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Postby nosebleeds » Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:11 am

razzle wrote:Watching the Witches (1990 Roeg) and why was he allowed to make childens films? This is traumatic to rewatch

Great movie.

The Witches, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and Return to Oz definitely fucked me up as a child.
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Postby it's the suspense that gets me » Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:15 am

the witches (1990) was like... deeply buried into my subconscious, scenes from it haunting me, not knowing the name of it for many years. it was playing on the hospital tv after i went into the er because i had severe 2nd degree burns on my leg. watched it as they fed me dilaudid. felt like a spiritual experience.

definitely one of the most scarring childrens films but not in a way i necessarily dislike.
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Postby razzle » Sat Dec 21, 2019 10:02 am

Yeah so much of this is etched in my subconscious. Glad I am not the only one.
At least we have
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Postby it's the suspense that gets me » Sun Dec 22, 2019 12:11 am

edit:saving for something
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Postby Celiac » Sun Dec 22, 2019 12:59 am

Hey gdw, can you and your wife save some brilliance and writing ability for the rest of us? :D
Douglas Jones... He moved like a cobra.
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Postby Celiac » Mon Dec 23, 2019 11:57 am

Bc of gdw’s excellent post I rewatched the departed for the first time in about ten years and really liked it. I was blown away by how much I liked the dropkick murphys song lol but yeah, great movie.
Douglas Jones... He moved like a cobra.
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Postby palmer eldritch » Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:09 pm

hopefully we have passed the departed backlash which I think was because ppl were like ugh this is exaggerated/ridiculous I want gritty unpleasant real crime on the movie screen rolleyes
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Postby Celiac » Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:12 pm

It’s just a cool movie about texting on flip phones and over the top imagery. Also has Alec Baldwin going “PATRIOT ACT! YES!”
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Postby palmer eldritch » Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:13 pm

its a beautiful city symphony movie imo
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Postby palmer eldritch » Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:14 pm

the roles baldwin and wahlberg were born to play tbh
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Postby delgriffith » Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:16 pm

Earlier this year my wife and I got back to our hotel room after a friend's wedding, and we were exhausted and hungry. We ordered room service and I turned on the TV while we waited for the food, and The Departed was on TV (this was in the UK so it was basically unedited) and I insisted on staying up to watch the whole thing having initially said "Can we just watch up until the scene where Jack Nicholson pretends to be a rat?"

Wasn't a popular decision but it was the correct one
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Postby Celiac » Mon Dec 23, 2019 1:26 pm

palmer eldritch wrote:its a beautiful city symphony movie imo

Well said... Marty does Irish-American very well too, who would have thunk
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Postby paused anime for this » Tue Dec 24, 2019 6:46 pm

*̣̥☆·͙̥‧❄‧̩̥·‧•̥̩̥͙‧·‧̩̥˟͙ new takes ˟͙‧̩̥·‧•̥̩̥͙‧·‧̩̥❄‧·͙̥̣☆*̣̥

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Dead Ringers (Cronenberg, 1988)
years ago i went to a cronenberg exhibit in amsterdam and saw a bunch of props including the appendage from the dream scene. it was kinda adorbs. anyway this film doesnt have a bad moment, very polished (some odd sound mixing in one scene but im nitpicking)

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Secret Sunshine (Lee, 2007)
depressing film about a woman coping with grief — perfect to watch this xmas with the fam! srsly well paced with great acting

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Breaking the Waves (von Trier, 1996)
apparently von trier said this about the film: “all you have to do is come up with with something really stupid, and it will become a great success”. he wasnt joking this is really stupid. hate how dogshit this film looks too

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L’Eclisse (Antonioni, 1962)
first and last scenes are 10/10, the rest is ok. theres a cringe blackface dance scene in the first 30 mins that really kills the mood

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Frownland (Bronstein, 2007)
enigmatic but mostly unwatchable portrait of a character based on the director’s cousin. bronstein seems cool from the interview with him and josh safdie i watched but the film is a ehh no for me

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Out of the Past (Tourneur, 1947)
solid. cinematography and kirk douglas’s performance stands out. wish the dialogue had more personality tho

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Who Framed Roger Rabbit (Zemeckis, 1988)
loved the world in this, so imaginative and quite dark. that toontown scene in the 2nd half is a treasure
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Postby palmer eldritch » Tue Dec 24, 2019 6:52 pm

give that sound mixing hell
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Postby Celiac » Tue Dec 24, 2019 6:55 pm

paused anime for this wrote:Image
L’Eclisse (Antonioni, 1962)
first and last scenes are 10/10, the rest is ok. theres a cringe blackface dance scene in the first 30 mins that really kills the mood

God I hated that scene so much. So bizarre and weird. I love L’Avventura, La Notte and Red Desert (Red Desert especially) so it was such a bummer. The rest of the movie I barely remember, but yeah, bad taste
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Postby paused anime for this » Tue Dec 24, 2019 6:56 pm

palmer eldritch wrote:give that sound mixing hell

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Postby paused anime for this » Tue Dec 24, 2019 7:04 pm

Celiac wrote:
paused anime for this wrote:Image
L’Eclisse (Antonioni, 1962)
first and last scenes are 10/10, the rest is ok. theres a cringe blackface dance scene in the first 30 mins that really kills the mood

God I hated that scene so much. So bizarre and weird. I love L’Avventura, La Notte and Red Desert (Red Desert especially) so it was such a bummer. The rest of the movie I barely remember, but yeah, bad taste

theres a criterion commentary where the guy tries to intellectualize the scene but lol Image
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Postby Celiac » Tue Dec 24, 2019 7:05 pm

No thanks!!!!
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Postby Eyeball Kid » Tue Dec 24, 2019 7:07 pm

I remember when listening to that commentary track I was yelling "no" and also "you fuckwit" at my tv

It's a really good movie, but that fucking scene takes me out it for several minutes after it's over
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Postby it's the suspense that gets me » Thu Dec 26, 2019 12:17 pm

i broke the habit of putting a big post here everytime i watch something cuz i've simultaneously 1. been watching a lot of films over the past few weeks 2. been relatively preoccupied with other projects involving writing so just wanna write out some thoughts on what i've watched recently real quick...

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italianamerican (scorsese, 1974)

it's really neat how all of the stuff i've talked about re: one of the biggest themes in scorsese's work here being identity and how that relates to self-mythology are present here, in one of his earliest films. it's a much warmer film than just about any of the other ones i've seen, given that it's about his parents, who he obviously loves and are real people. it made me really nostalgic for the parts of family gatherings i enjoyed as a child, just old couples bickering and telling stories. it's also neat that he chose to document this given the theme in his latter period work about the fracturing of american community and legacy (see: de niro's final monologue in casino, the entirety of the departed). i dunno. this was a film that meant a lot to me to watch over christmastime. might become a yearly staple for me.

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no direction home (scorsese, 2005)

kindof the same deal in a lot of ways. an examination on which artists are responsible for the meaning their work takes on and their own self-image. dylan is a bigger asshole than scorsese's parents but the film is still a very warm and empathetic picture of him. bob dylan began to fascinate me over the past year for very similar reasons to why scorsese's films do, so this was a natural fit. i can't think of another major rock figure that's so invested in telling ridiculous bullshit stories about their lives in service of some vague sense of image building? the way it uses his words v. the perception of the people that surround him to come to a better understanding of who he actually is is really masterful. given, i think that's true of most media that's released under the bootleg series. in getting that uncut vision you really get a much better idea of who bob dylan was and who he's going for than any of his recorded albums. this film is obviously one of the biggest examples of that, but the another self-portrait compilation from a few years ago is expressing something very similar as well, putting one of his 'worst albums' into a context that ends up making it one of his best/most powerful. it's technically like, very clearly something that was made for pbs. but outside of that it's a pretty wonderful film that actually tracks quite well with scorsese's narrative features.

his inclusion in the movie is warranted but god i hate looking at or thinking about allen ginsberg lol.

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i posted about them a little in their respective threads but imo scarface/casino made a really interesting double feature in terms of both being gangster epics that essentially depict humans who's relationships are entirely transactional. casino was very clearly the best film, and i think a much sharper and honed critique but they're both stylistic marvels. after having watched a bunch of de palma's horror films i really appreciate how much of it is shot like one (i.e. chainsaw scene, anytime the incest subplot comes to the forefront, the nyc chase scene). really adds a sense of gravity to it. i knew it was a film i liked but i feel more comfortable defending it now altho i get why pacino's performance and cuban accent would wreck it for people and i completely empathize with that.

for as much shit ppl give scorsese about "having his cake and eating it too" i think goodfellas, casino and wows all have some of the most harrowing depictions of domestic violence i've ever seen commited to screen. i don't think they would work nearly as well if they weren't contrasted with cartoonish images of how little any of these guys actually give a shit about anyone around them. in the sopranos thread i compared the tony/carmela fights in "whitecaps" to the lengthy domestic quarrels in billy woodberry/charles burnett's bless their little hearts but occams razor to me at this point says that scorsese was already working in that same vein. i wouldn't have been confident enough in this to argue it but i do feel legitimately incredibly embarassed that i would've been sympathetic to the "he makes the same movie over and over, glorifies gangsters etc." take that mcu stans seem to resolute in as early as may of this year, before watching "mean streets". scorsese is the living legend fuck it all and no regrets i hit the lights on these dark sets etc. etc.

maybe watching uncut gems directly after those films helped, but i definitely viewed it as kindof a body horror film about someone that's physiologically addicted to making the worst possible decisions because money has become his entire life. both psychedelic shots of open holes in the body, the repeated references to his libido being determined on making money or not making money. etc. i won't post much about it cuz it has it's own thread too but yeah. i ain't seen the irishman (or a bunch of other smaller films i'm still waiting to see) yet but that's probably my favorite theater experience of 2019.

did jingle all the way (1995), always a good time

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ms. 45 (1983, ferrara)

one of the main impressions i had while watching this was how much this film feels authored by zoe lund as much as it does ferrara. her performance in this is fucking stellar. it's so lived-in and contains so many small details regarding the realities of passive sexual violence that i rarely see captured on film? like, after she starts killing people there's a scene where a dude is tailing her and she's stopped at a crosswalk. the ridiculously claustrophobic shots of her walking home from work. i won't relay any personal anecdotes but gee whiz that was effective. reading more about it, she's made the claim that she filled in quite a bit of the script, and that it was pretty barebones before she became involved. i don't know. i find that kinda easy to buy, esp. given her later collabs w/ ferrara on bad lieutenant and new rose hotel (coincidentally, the only ferrara films i've ever seen. now i'm v. curious to watch some of his other films without her involvement to see how they compare. i love every one of those.).

this film really takes two of my all time most hated genres (death wish power fantasy and rape/revengealtho those two are very often one and the same. kanye's "violent crimes" in cinematic form as i've experienced.) and did something really interesting with it. zoe lund wrote an essay here: http://zoelund.com/docs/ShipWith8Sails.html that i think fairly succinctly communicates why i thought it was so successful in doing something interesting with that concept. i like how the boss is framed as the root of every issue here. i'd like to write something deeper about this film that doesn't explicitly rely on personal experience but it's kindof difficult given how many specific moments in my life that i've either witnessed or had happen to me were conjured up by this film.

i say this about like, quite a few films, but more than any other one i've seen i think this communicates literally everything than joker (2019) wanted to and more in a runtime of what... 75 minutes? using the framework of an 'exploitation' movie? this film even takes place in the same time period in nycs history, it's a stunningly gorgeous film that relies on ambient sound design. it's such a great film. i recommend it heavily. anyway i like movie.
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Postby tgk » Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:37 pm

echoing praise for portrait of a lady on fire here

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absolute masterpiece my heart never stopped racing.
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Postby it's the suspense that gets me » Fri Dec 27, 2019 12:38 pm

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strange circus (2005, sono)

i wanted to write a lot here, it's certainly a weighty film, but given how reliant this film is on twists, i think saying anything substantial borders on impossible for a general thread. speaking in the broadest terms possible, i feel like every piece of commentary on intergenerational trauma and queerness that was implicit in ari aster's hereditary (2018) is here, in full on in your face unavoidable in your face explicit form? i actually don't know which approach i prefer, but i did end up appreciating how in-your-face this film was about it. i can't think of a single other film that seems as designed to hit as many trigger subjects for me possible but i thought pretty much every single one of them was handled well. even the trope of murderous trans personToggle Spoiler (maybe the first film i've seen tackle this trope with the requisite empathy necessary to do something interesting with it? silence of the lambsToggle Spoiler certainly tried i guess, altho even tho i've reached a point where i'm empathetic to it's flawed treatment of the subject at this point in time i still find it goofy to the detriment of the film. it's also working towards completely different means than any other film i've ever seen employ that trope, to the point where i barely even know if it counts. i dunno. fascinating stuff.)

the fact that sono released suicide club (2002) at age 40 and in the near 20 years since then has done nothing but release films that feel youthful, vibrant, and empathetic is one of those heartwarming tales that gives you hope for your own creative endeavors.

i think the last film i had that ticked as many of those boxes and really had me having no idea how i felt about it until the credits rolled was my revisit of rob zombie's devils rejects (2005) last year. still can't even try to rank where it fits in sono's filmography because it's uhh... again... a lot... but it's certainly a worthwhile addition and i don't regret checking it out at all, like i thought i might going in.

given the aforementioned potentially problematic subject matter, and my recent interest in de palma i'm probably about ready to check out dressed to killToggle Spoiler. i saw the trailer for it at the music box earlier this year and it looked like the Best Fucking Movie.
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